Episode 09: Knowing DISC Improves Sales Prospecting

EP9Thumbnail

 

John

Welcome to the show everybody. Today we talk about prospecting. And you’re going to hear some very different opinions on prospecting as we kind of work our way across the table. I’m not a huge fan of it, I think it’s one of the hardest things about being a salesperson. The other three, Nannette, Clint, and Al, all love it. So don’t necessarily listen to the person who you normally resonate with. Listen to the person who is in the industry closest to your current industry. And if you’re getting any value out of this, please share it with someone else. This is hard enough as it is, doesn’t need to be harder. And if you’re listening to this, leave us a review. We read all of them. That’s how we improve. Follow us on social media. Everything is at sales throwdown. And I hope you enjoy the show.

Announcer

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the main event. In the D corner we have Clint The Cleaver Bigelow. In the I corner, we have Al The Gambler Daniel. In the S corner, we have Nan The Promoter Fallman. In the C corner, we have John Small Mountain Hill. Let’s get ready to throwdown.

John

Today, we are going to talk a little bit about prospecting, actually a lot about prospecting because it is hands down the worst part about being a salesperson. Does anyone disagree with that statement?

Clint

I think it’s the easiest.

Al

I kind of agree. So well.

John

Let’s talk about well, hold on. Before we get into prospecting, can I share a story about about something that I messed up completely? And I’m kind of curious what, you how you guys would handle it.

Al

Shoot.

John

Real life story from the field, okay. I get a referral. Right. And I get pretty good insight into this referral, right? There’s, there’s an internal champion there, who’s not the decision maker, who will kind of build themselves up to be the decision maker, but that they’ve got clout, but to be aware that they are that they don’t. I said okay. I go meet with this person. And it’s in an industry that’s got a lot of oversight and, and regulation. And that typically doesn’t work very well for what I do anyway. Because you know, the more oversight, the harder it is to put client information into do good CRM management, you know, into an outside CRM. So I meet with them and there’s so much pain, right? Pain, pain, pain, I really need this, I’m not gonna be successful. I really want to like leave my mark and everything else. Okay, awesome. What you think we should do now? And he’s like, well, come in, talk to my counterpart. He’s the president’s son. Okay. I said, Okay. Cool. I’m happy to do that. I’m a little bit curious though. I feel like the President’s going to have some concerns about what we’re talking about here. How do we make sure that his concerns get addressed? And he says, well, come in, meet with his son. And as long as we are on board, united front, we’ll be good to go. Perfect. Awesome. Alright, so I go in, I meet with both of them. Once again, all kinds of pain right there. They really want what I’m doing. Right? And this is the trap, right? Because they’re so optimistic. Oh, yeah, man, we need this. We need this. We need this. And so I leave that meeting. And then the problems kind of start, you know. Well, you know, seems a little expensive, said we, you know, we talked about budget, you guys kind of gave me the budget, feels like something has changed. Can we talk about that? Well, you know, blah blah blah, all this stuff. And then the president’s out of town, president’s back and all this stuff. And so now, me and the original guy, I’ve got pretty good rapport at this point, right? And so we’re texting back and forth about about the deal, and like, what’s gonna happen? And he was like, well, maybe I should just start using a CRM. Yes, obviously. And then once they see how good I’m doing with it, then that will prove that you should come in and help us out with this thing. And I’m like, okay, can I tell you my concerns. And he says, yes. And so I give my concerns to him, you know, that typically, if it’s just one person, not a united front, not everyone’s bought in, you’re probably dealing in a couple of other systems, and then you’re getting pulled in multiple directions. And that’s not really how I work, right? I very much a burn your boats mentality. So I said, You know, I listed that out. And he was like, Man, that makes complete sense. I said, What do you think we should do? And he was like, Well, let me keep working on it. And I was like, Okay, cool. I’m just gonna let you know, I’m gonna close the file though. Because right now, we don’t really have a next step. You know, but I’m curious from the other people here at the table, right? Where do you, like, how do you run that differently than I did?

Let’s start with the D because he’s, he’s cueing himself up over there.

Clint

Well, I think you did a, you did everything that I probably would have done, you would have got the information, right, you did a good job of getting that. I think it happens a lot in all our businesses, to the point where people when we go back home after our first meeting, it’s it’s kind of love is in the air, that honeymoon phase is like, okay, we gotta, we’re all going to get into this. And then Time goes by a week goes by a day goes by whatever. And all the sudden you start realizing that this isn’t really a fit, for either one of us. Like we’re not ready to make that move. We’re not ready to make that investment. We’re feeling pressure from the sales guy. In this case, that’s you, John. So a little bit of pressure from you may be asking a lot of uncomfortable questions. Which is our job, right? That’s what we’re supposed to do. So we’re supposed to dive in and get that pain. We’re supposed to really realize the gravity of the situation that they’re in and whether that’s real or not. I think that you had all the right decision makers in that in that situation. I probably because I’m gut-feel. I think I wouldn’t have divulged so much information, I probably would have dropped them quicker. But the good, the good and bad of that, right. So I drop it, I move on, I’m going to go find somebody else to spend my time with. Sure. Now you’re not spending a lot of time so it’s not that big a deal. This is a couple text message, couple emails, couple phone calls, whatever, and two meetings. Yeah, so it’s not that big of a deal. You didn’t lose anything?

John

No. And I’ve got a point to make after after I hear from y’all.

Clint

I’m sure I do.

I guess, in my, and in my, in my immediate business, I think that once I get that gut feel of people pull back just a touch, it’s over in my book. And that’s my industry, okay. So when people love to talk about ideas People love to get an idea to go pass up the chain of command to their bosses, to their bosses. So hey, I reached out to this guy, he gave me a budget of like, $2200 a month, this is what this CRM is going to cost us. We’re gonna, you know, here’s my presentation. They said, okay, great, thanks. Thanks for doing all that research. That’s the end of it. And that’s one step of not getting to the decision maker. In my business, that deal is dead, there’s no funding, there is no money. It’s an idea. It’s an idea on a wall full of ideas that you’re throwing darts at. So for me, I’m done. I’m out. I’m moving on to something that has real clout.

John

Interesting. Al?

Al

So two things, the two things that stuck out in your story is they were giving up pain. Didn’t sound like you were having to ask too many questions to get to, you know, what their issues were?

John

You know. So that’s a good point. The first guy is really eager to make his mark in this new company, because it’s a it’s a new role for him inside of their company. So he is trying to bring some structure because the old organization that he was with had a lot of CRM and management and forecasting and things like that. So he wanted to bring that in and kind of be the guy who was leading the charge on this thing, right.

Al

So you colored that picture a little bit better, but so he wasn’t holding back. He’s like, here’s my problem. So it seems to me that then the son comes in, and I’m just going to call him Puppet. Okay, because that’s what I think sometimes. Right? And, and until proven otherwise, right? Are you just a legacy, you know, so I got daddy’s foreskin here. And I’m having to peel that back right? To get to the real meat of what’s going on. Right, which is the guy who can actually sign the check and make that happen. Okay.

Clint

And sometimes I think that the president’s son, hey, hey, son, let’s see what you’re made of, go handle the situation. And he doesn’t know dick about what we’re talking about.

Al

And sometimes they do, sometimes they don’t. I threw that out as kind of tongue in cheek, but I immediately would have been trying to take it away.

John

Okay.

Al

And negative…

Clint

What do you mean by that?

Al

Well, because the pendulum’s way up high. And they are very excited about you know, what’s going on. So start really, yeah, I just start trying to destroy it.

John

You know, so, so you’re talking about this, like the opposite of like leading the witness? Right, you know, asking questions from that, from that negative point of view to kind of see if they’re going to move with you.

Al

Right.

John

Okay. I feel like I did an okay job of that, right. Hold on, Nan, you have any… or you said you had two things? What was that all of them?

Al

No, it was just that one guy’s real excited. But you explained why he was so excited. And so that made sense. It wasn’t part of your story. And then you know, the son, is he just a proxy for the dad and he’s taking up space? Or does he have real value in this whole equation? Absolutely. And those were my only two things. And so there’s where you test that, right?

Nannette

So in your story, how much time did you spend with them?

John

I had two meetings, probably four or five emails. And then I know, three or four text messages.

Nannette

So for me, there wasn’t enough bonding and rapport, I think there needs to be a lot of bonding and rapport. So when there’s issues come up, there’s a relationship that you can bank on ticketing.

Clint

Actually a really good point. That summed up what your problems are, man, I agree with you hundred percent. Bonding and rapport prior to those meetings, get you a lot of insight.

John

So um…

Al

Wait, wait, wait, I gotta stop. So are we talking Sunday dinner bonding and rapport? I mean, if his sales cycle runs that quick. You run it? Right?

John

That’s how I feel about it.

Clint

Okay, Nan, why don’t you finish? I’m sorry, I cut you off. Will you finish because that’s a good point.

Nannette

I just think that when you have issues come up if you haven’t established any relationship. So you’re thinking, so I guess from what Al said, he can’t do that with every client. So every prospective client.

Al

But I think that was already stated that he was at a different position. I’m assuming bonding and rapport had already taken place. So we were just talking about the meat and potatoes.

Nannette

I didn’t assume, so I was like, so when did you create some kind of…

Clint

So this brings up a really good point, though, because you had bonding rapport with the guy that wasn’t decision maker.

John

Correct. Yeah. So I’ve been beating myself up about this kind of exchange for like, a couple of weeks, like trying to think about how I could have handled it better what I could have done differently, which is just kind of like how I do things. So, my connection, my internal champion, my white knight, whatever you want to call, it has been very on point as far as this communication with me, Hey, man, like, I’m still working on this and everything else. So it’s not like they went dark. Right, which, at least there’s that, you know, where I failed? Where I did not do a good job was I didn’t press hard enough. But on the other side of things, is that sometimes you’re not going to get your way. Right. And and this is kind of the conclusion that I was kind of coming to today, because I was, you know, journaling about it trying to figure out, you know, like, how, how would I handle this in the future? Because I can make the decision to be like, hey, look, if I can’t talk to talk to the real decision maker, we’re done. I gotta go.

Clint

Well, then yeah, you’ll never get a meeting.

John

Absolutely. Right. So So I did the best that I could, right. I, I asked questions around the decision maker, tried to get them involved. They they’ve got the kind of weird convoluted board process about like, everything goes to like a committee and everything else like this. So.

Clint

Let’s not forget the fact that you truly, I don’t want to, I don’t want to dime out anybody and call them a liar. But you were lied to. Because if somebody says we need this, we’re excited about this, all the… because I know you too well, to go through that process. You know, and do it correctly.

John

My walls were up from, from, from the jump start of the referral because of the industry that they’re it, I was like, this is never going to go.

Clint

But some, but sometimes we all go into those meetings. And they’re excited. And that’s a lie. They need this. That’s just a lie. They’re just excited that you’re there. And they’re talking about something. Some people are like that some people are so I’m not saying some majority. I’m just saying sometimes this might be one of those deals where you just…

Al

But, but take his story just at face value. Let’s not try to build something that is there. Right. If you have a question, I think you should ask John that.

John

I don’t, I don’t think I was lied to. I firmly believe that this guy really sees a ton of value in instituting some like sales systems and processes and good CRM habits, because he’d seen it at the last organization, right. So I don’t think he lied to me, I just don’t think he was nearly as influential as he thought that he was right. And if you if they’re set up in a way to where you’re never going to get to the decision maker, then you can draw that line in the sand and say, Hey, if I can’t talk to them, I’m out. But…

Clint

If I did that, I would probably never, I would get half the jobs that I get. If I set a line in the sand to say if I can’t talk to the decision maker. I know that’s a very important step in our sales process. I agree with it. But sometimes you have to build confidence, like you’re saying, and your white knight or your you know, internal champion on the other team to sell this for you. And you have to give them all the tools to do that.

Nannette

That was my point that you you have to create relationship from, instead of…

John

And I had no real rapport with the president son, right? Just one meeting, he thought that this was kind of good. He was he was a process oriented guy he was he was not a D or an I, you know, he’s somewhere in the C sector with me. And it’s like, I’m talking about this, and he’s done this and everything else. So I just think that there, I think that I put them in a bad spot to go have to go sell me to someone else, which is not really what I’m, what I’m ever trying to do. But sometimes you got to play ball with what you have. So at least I uncovered as much as I could. So it wasn’t a total loss. Because I’m not working in the dark.

Clint

And you didn’t, you didn’t lose anything.

Nannette

Well, and you gain, anytime you do something, you’ve gained something.

Al

Other than the breaths of air and the time that you never get back.

Clint

Absolutely. Sometimes that’s a big wrecker, right? Sometimes your time is way more valuable than what you put into it. In this situation, I think, he didn’t lose anything.

Al

But I’ll preface that. If you had nothing better to do during that time, there wasn’t a better prospect. There wasn’t a better something to be after. It’s because there’s where you need to rack up your disappointment. Oh, I could have been doing this. Yeah. Now if you don’t have that statement that you can say then you’re fine. Yeah, use your time. I mean, hang for sure that then nothing ventured, nothing gained.

John

And this kind of ties us into like tonight’s topic of just prospecting in general, because…

Al

Oh, is that what we’re talking about?

John

Now we are. So…

Al

I like it.

John

The, in my opinion, the difference between people who kill it in sales and people who don’t? Are the people who manage their time incredibly well and can cut ties and walk away from something right? Completely agree. In prospecting you’re, you’re not going to win every prospect you sit down across from, right? It’s just, it just doesn’t happen.

Al

Don’t try. Don’t even try.

John

Absolutely right. Because…

Nannette

You can’t be disappointed.

John

Right? You manage the leading indicator, right? And then you just kind of trust in the process and the results because you have data to kind of work on. And this is me being the database guy. I know that not everyone runs the same process that I do.

Al

Speak for yourself. When you say data, I’m like, it’s called the bank account. Is there money or is there no money?

Clint

Still data.

John

Still data. Right.

Al

It is a leading indicator.

John

Well, it’s a lagging indicator, right? Because lagging indicator. Correct. The leading indicators the thing you have control over. The lagging indicator is what is the end result of the thing.

Al

There’s always a smart one in the room? Okay, I stand corrected. Roll.

John

So, so prospecting,

Nannette

Edit, edit Dr. Daniel.

John

So prospecting right? I feel it’s the hardest thing as a salesperson, but you two guys both think that it’s easiest thing and I was kind of getting the feeling from Nan.

Nannette

I like it.

John

Really? Okay, so for Nan, we’ll start with you because, hold on, I’m going to start with Nan.

Clint

Yeah, but I want to, but I want to clarify. Okay, it’s the hardest thing.

Nannette

Please do, Clint. We can’t wait.

Clint

Hardest thing, easiest thing, fun thing are three different things.

John

Alright, so what’re you labeling prospecting then?

Clint

Well, I’m saying I think it’s the easiest, Doc also said that. Nan says it’s fun. That’s different than being easy.

John

Oh, that’s interesting. Okay.

Nannette

Everything’s easy.

John

Everything?

Al

Til it’s not.

John

Yeah. Alright so Nan?

Clint

You didn’t track on that one?

Al

I did. Yeah. must have gone over my head. It’s been a big week. Couple weeks, yeah. And I’m not, I’m a little punchy today.

Nannette

You’re the only person in the whole world that’s had a tough week, Dr. Daniel.

Al

In my mind, anyway. Pain is unique, right?

John

Back on topic, prospecting. In your, in your world, in healthcare and stuff like that. That involves typically a lot of drop-ins you know? Yeah. And lunches is kind of the big thing you know, that everyone talks about? What is that? Is that your two main avenues? Are there other, other avenues for prospecting that you do?

Nannette

I love referrals. I love working with offices that know, you know, someone in the office and I can go to that person. Cold calling for me to go into an office, I love. I think it’s, you just are striking up another relationship. Now, it is all about relationship for me and hearing from other offices another office to call on and someone they know and reaching out in that aspect of I don’t know a white knight another white knight. I just think once you have a trusted client, then they can refer you to another office and you’re going to do well because they’re, they’re going to have, be comfortable with you initially so you’re not like this brand new person walking in the office.

John

So, in your book of business now like, like what percentage of that has come from referrals versus how much of that do you think is coming from just like cold walk ins?

Nannette

Probably 80% is referred because our bu… it’s so small. You know, in the medical field, it’s so small, so you, you’re just calling on a very…

Al

Okay, wait a second. No, no, no, wait, wait a second because I think you’re speaking but relative to your longevity in this industry, which is now. When you first started?

Nannette

Okay, when I first started…

Al

There’s a difference there, and it needs to be noted.

Clint

Yeah, and what… No, I agree with that. Seasoned veterans in the group are just going to make contacts over contacts over contacts. And over time you’re going to…

Al

But when she first started and she still does, I mean, I know for a fact that you walk into offices you’ve never been into. But you’ve been into a lot of offices just because you’re timing right.

Nannette

I also think the new offices, the cold calling, that was in quotations, that you are calling on you. You still need to do some investigation, is what it, what kind of business do they do. You know, I don’t, it’s predicated on what…

Clint

So even though you’re referred, you’re still running a sales process. You’re still running them through your…

Nannette

Finding out what kind of business they do, how many…

Al

When she says referred, that’s different than cold calling because she still drops in a lot.

Clint

I’m saying, but either way you run them through your process.

Nannette

Absolutely.

John

Is your process different from like a, from like a cold walk in from like a to a referral?

Nannette

Oh, absolutely. Hundred percent.

John

Mine is as well.

Clint

Is your, do you think your referrals, you said it’s really high. That’s awesome. One. Do you think it’s personal or because of the company that you work for?

Nannette

Oh, personal, for sure.

Al

Definitely the company she works for.

Nannette

No, it is totally personal.

Al

That is one bad mofo.

Clint

But even though, even though people love you, somebody…

Nannette

People trust me, they know that I’m not going to…

Clint

But you still you still have to perform.

John

You gotta fulfill.

Clint

Fulfill, a better word. So…

Nannette

Yeah, I think that’s a way better word. Thank you John.

Al

No, then why are we practicing all that? Like, dog? You know, that little horse whip thing that we do?

Nannette

Clint, were you saying something?

John

Right. So, so Nan’s business because she’s been in two kind of main industries in there. And they’ve got a lot of overlap, right? You know, you’re calling on the same people. So I’ve seen this happen with you, right? You know, you go into an office and then someone’s like, Nan! And it’s someone that you’ve known from, like, the the pharmaceutical side. And now they just work in this other office, and they remember you, right? But your your ability to be memorable to people who you have not seen in years was always astounding to me. Right? Because like people would see you and just whereas I feel like I’m pretty forgetful. Or, you know, yeah, forgetful…

Al

Only in your own mind.

John

Okay, thank you. I mean, I guess it’s a compliment.

Clint

How do you forget a small mountain man?

John

I don’t know man.

Nannette

I said that’s not true. But I think it’s not true. I think you’re very memorable. I think you’re very, very kind.

Clint

God that S flares so hard.

John

It sounds like I was fishing for a compliment. And that was not, that was not the case. Alright, so Al, prospecting?

Al

It is clearly a combination of longevity. But I started new, and knocked on a lot of doors, and hated it with a passion.

Nannette

Whoa, I never knew that.

John

You told me a story one time that, uh, that I still think about, and I and I laugh every time I think about this. Because being a chiropractor, right, you knew a lot of these, like surgeons and people like that, because like, if you couldn’t help them, then eventually you’d have to refer them to. Right. Yeah. And and you go into a surgeon’s office? And the guy says, did you lose your license?

Al

Yeah, yeah. brings up a good point. So yeah, when I made the transition out of clinical, you know, of being like a portal of entry, that was now referral base. And, basically, I had two businesses, one was retail in the DME side of things, bracing and things like that. And so when I got into dead body parts, and the bigger aspects of healthcare, if you will, like, you know.

Nannette

Can I tell him what you really do, like, you know, if I’m going to meet the surgeons, I’m gonna have to have some spine surgery. And so hey, this not you know, I’m gonna have to have my L4 worked on.

Al

That’s not, that’s not true. But, I took one thing that I had been successful at, had built up, and I parlayed it into another. And, and it’s it’s leveraging, it’s leveraging relationships, it’s leveraging who you know, for who they know. And, you know, it’s the domino effect. But you, every time you turn a new venture, meaning you start into a sales role at a new company, or you start a new endeavor in sales, you have to, you shorten the learning curve, first of all, right. You use all the all the tools that got you where you were to get you to the next level. And even if, I’m going to speak to the guy that just got his first sales job, right? The incredible thing is that if you’re the frontline guy, if you’re making things happen, if we’re calling it sales, and you’re facing the prospect, the guy that will buy, then keep that momentum going. No matter where you go use the talents that you developed out in that field, or in your field, to reconnect to everybody and ask them who they know in your new field.

John

Oh, that’s interesting.

Al

Because I could look left and right. And we’re all from the same geographical area. And we could talk about restaurants that we know of, we could talk about places we’ve been, we could build some common ground, just off of proximity. Right?

John

Yeah, for sure. Right. So one of the things I think about all the time is these people that are graduating from college, right, and like, you’ve got a good network already, right? So, you know, call, call those people and say, hey, I’m working on this thing, right? Because like, no one’s going to college, because they want to be a salesperson, right? Like, it doesn’t happen that way. You know, you’re hoping for something else, and then you get done. And then you can find something you want. You’re like, okay, I, I’ll go, you know, sling my stuff.

Clint

That’s silly.

John

What’s silly?

Clint

They should go to college for sales.

John

Okay.

Nannette

We’ll need you to elaborate.

Al

Well, what when they everybody eventually, you know, gets out? Guess what? You’re in sales now? For sure.

John

I mean, you’re selling yourself until you get a job. Exactly.

Al

Yeah, no, you hit it, but they don’t. But colleges really don’t get that, medical schools don’t do that. Most of your education is going to be predicated on what they call didactic, right? What what’s the cortical information you need to know for the process that you must get out there and do. But before you can really do your process, somebody’s got to be willing to pay for it.

Clint

Somebody’s got to buy it.

Al

Yeah, they gotta pay for it. So coming out, but you hit on a good thing. And I think, when you go to, you know, if you’re a junior college graduate then maybe everybody lands locally, and which is a good thing. Which I encourage that. Go to community college, cuz most of those guys are going to springboard into local businesses. They weren’t born into that pedigree family, they’re not moving out to the East Coast, West Coast. Now you graduate from Harvard, then I would be looking at a multinational company, because those guys are going to fly to the wind, and you’re going to have the whole world as your oyster.

Clint

And most of your hungry people are recruiting from those community colleges.

Al

But let me stop you, you can make millions of dollars in a one square mile.

Clint

100%.

Al

If you’re in the Health District of any community direction, if you’re in construction, you don’t have to look very far. Quit with the bullshit. The rainbow, right? The grass is greener over there. Wherever your f-ing standing. That’s where you start.

John

I agree with that. So for you for now, right? You know, how much prospecting do you do now or, or is most of what you do now, just kind of managing your your existing book and kind of nurturing those relationships.

Al

It’s a lot of that, but I have other people that do that. So I want to be able to turn the process of the sale and the completion of the sale over to somebody else, so I can get to the next one. Right.

John

Okay, because like most people try to offload it the other way. Right?

Al

Oh, the sales side of things. Yeah,

John

I know so many entrepreneurs who are just scared shitless about, like having to be like the salesperson for forever. And so what they tried to do was to try to offload sales. And then we’re not really great teachers and delegators just by default, you know. Those are learned skill sets. So you know, and so then you go out, you hire some people, when, because sales gets treated the way that it does, sink or swim, and, you know, you might make it and then I’ll know your name and all that shit, that happens. And so then we’ve got these like, terrible sales cultures, like, in some of these companies. But it’s awesome that, you know, because it would be easy for you to just be like, you know what, I’m not the sales guy anymore. I’m just gonna sit back and I’m gonna run this thing. I know.

Al

Yes, and no. I mean, would you ever want to get outta? And I’m talking to Clint here, to my right. I mean, because I get, there’s a whole process that comes behind you.

Clint

Yeah, I don’t know that I would trust anybody to take over my book of business tomorrow.

John

Oh, that…

Al

And that’s, I feel that, that exact, exactly the same way.

Nannette

I totally feel that way. I can never let someone take over…

Al

Well, okay, I can send somebody over. But they’re an extension of me. Right? They don’t ever… backup, that sounds a little egotistical.

Clint

But it’s correct. Hold on.

Al

I’m trying to be nice.

Clint

No, don’t be nice, because literally, when you when you hire a new sales rep to do your job, as you move up in the company, or you take over your own business, you’ve got to hire somebody to do the, to do what you’ve been doing as a business owner growing a business, and now they have to perform it. And, and they have to ensure the same confidence that you insured and your customers. That’s tough.

Al

Okay, but true, but you, hear me out on this. I’m not here to create a job, right?

John

For yourself?

Al

No, I’m here to have a business. As a business owner, I have to be the you know, I want to be on the forefront of doing it as well as everybody else.

Clint

So so what better way in our world to be able to pass that on? If you have a good process built? Oh, and you learn somebody into that process? Oh, yeah. I mean, that’s best case scenario. But most good business people have a process. That’s why they’re at the top of the business. That’s why they bought their own business. That’s why they’re doing their own thing. They’re a leader. That’s what I think, that’s a forgotten thing. And now, especially in prospecting, is that you went out there and you killed it. You went out there, and you got people to trust you. And then you followed up, and, and you did what you said you could do. And then all the sudden you hire somebody else that goes out there, and that’s not you anymore. That that’s tough. It’s super tough. But if you have a process, if if you take what you know, and you put it down on paper, and you have data to back then because you track it, and you put that into your process, that’s a whole lot easier to hand over than hiring some dude off the street and say go sell my business.

Nannette

And that’s what I thought, I believe we’re doing here is we’ve been successful, we know how to do it. And we’re trying to teach people or show people how we’ve done it.

John

For sure. There, there’s a, there’s a great book that talks about this very thing, right? It’s called it’s called the E myth, right? And if you ever love that book, if you ever have aspirations about starting something, like go read this book.

Al

It’s a short read.

John

It’s, it’s amazing.

Al

For some of you.

John

But it talks about this very thing, that…

Clint

Are there big words? Are there pictures?

John

What sometimes happens though, is you’re holding that stuff in your head, and you’ve been doing it for so long that it becomes instinctual. And then it becomes instinctual. It becomes really hard to teach it to someone else. Because it’s just like, Oh, this is just this thing that I do, like trying to teach your kid how to like, tie their shoes from like the opposite end. Yeah. Oh, man. It’s a nightmare. And I’ve got lots of patience.

Clint

Tie a tie on a buddy’s shirt. Oh, it’s impossible. Can’t do it. I can stand behind you and do it. Yeah, I can tie it for you and throw it over your neck. But I can’t teach you do it from my side.

John

Exactly.

Al

So I when to a… Yeah, Nan’s got a story about that.

Nannette

So my oldest son was getting married. And this was last April, and Dr. Daniel was there and that the, all the guys…

Al

We get this emergency call.

Nannette

Like, so all the guys because they had bow ties, right. So and he wears bow tie, so he was savvy on it.

Al

Badass bowties!

John

Dapper.

Clint

Dapper and bowties don’t work anyway,

Al

Well when you work for Chippendales once upon a time. Come on, man.

Clint

Oh, you meant bow ties and nothing else.

Nannette

Clint, 30 seconds ago, I said that’s all he wears.

Clint

Sorry, I don’t, I don’t listen to most people. Go ahead, sorry.

Nannette

Okay, so all the guys come over. And they’re like, help us and and he he was struggling because it is hard.

Al

Well, I eventually went nut to butt, right. I just reached around their shoulders. And I’m like, guys, you know, get ready.

Nannette

It was very sweet, sweet moment.

Al

So yeah, I agree with the tying of shoes. And the bowties.

Nannette

Why did I say it was a sweet moment in a sales… Sorry bout that guys.

John

Okay, so Clint?

Clint

Don’t ask me, ask you. C next, I want to hear your thoughts.

John

About prospecting?

Clint

Yeah, I’m not ready.

John

I, god this is so C, but I treat, I treat it like a process, right. Like, each week, I’ve got certain things that I that I must do before…

Clint

You do?

John

Yeah,

Clint

A process?

John

I know. It’s weird. No one’s used to this as the C. But like, I I have certain things that I will not allow myself to quit work on like a Friday evening without saying that it’s done. And, and having that, you know, roadmap, whatever you want to call, it allows me to be just like, secure in the process. Because before this, right, but before I like, kind of went through this process of kind of creating my prospecting roadmap, you know what everyone call it? It, I was the annoying guy without realizing I was being annoying, right? Like, like, all my friends knew me as, oh, John’s a sales guy, he’s always selling, he’s always selling. You know, because like I always was, you know, trying to sell and trying to find the next thing, find the next prospect, find the next prospect, you know. And when I sold cell phones and banking and everything else, like everyone is so tired of hearing about it, right. But I’m running around talking to people that are not qualified prospects, you know, so I’m just the annoying guy like everybody else. And then, you know, through reading books, and talking to coaches and working with people and everything else, it’s like, oh, I can just put this on a process, and then I can just run my process. And then when it’s done, then I can move on to other stuff. And that, it was a huge impact for me.

Clint

How much, how much did that process save you on time? Resources?

John

So that’s a good question. Right? It, it depends upon your goals, right? Because the thing about it is, is you have to adjust, right. If I think a certain, certain number of asks, and cold calls and referral asks, and LinkedIn, you know, connection requests and things like that is going to get me to a certain number of qualified conversations, which leads me to a certain number of closed deals. I have to be willing to adjust that if I’m not hitting those milestone metrics. So you kind of have to adjust and make changes and my prospecting behaviors from when I was in the website world are completely different than my current prospecting behaviors, as you know, the CRM consultant.

Al

So, along those lines, but in a different sense. You, you built a process, and you exercise that process. And then you just went through the numbers, right? You just started, you know, absolutely. You know, opening doors. Yes, no, yes, no, yes, no.

John

It’s your, it’s your favorite thing. Right. Work with the end in mind. Right, right. I had a monetary goal that I wanted to make. Okay. I’m going to start to think about, okay, how much to make off the beach deal, right? What does a client bring me? How many of those clients do I need? You know, and then I break it down into like, an annual number, and then a monthly number, and things like that.

Al

Okay, but more specifically, so when you went in with your process, when did you know to cut bait or get out of the way and move on to the next one? What, I mean, and I know that may be different for every sales engagement, for sure. Right. But did you build that process with if I get here and I… does the algorithm go to a point that says, if no, get the fuck out? If yes, then you know, proceed.

John

For sure, right. Because the thing is, there’s a big difference between being a salesperson and being able to draw awareness around potential gaps in someone else’s business, and then being able to talk about, hey, I might be able to fill those gaps. Does that make sense to have a conversation about it? And just being an order taker, right, there’s, there’s a huge world of difference between those two things. And, excuse me, didn’t mean to cough in the mic. You got to be able to cut bait because once again, I have to save my time, right? Because it’s not… In the website world, we had developers, right. So like I would, I would sell a deal. We’d build a scope of work, we take payment, cool. Here’s your project manager, and like, let’s get this thing done. But now, I’m also handling all the fulfillment, right? So I have to balance my prospecting with my fulfillment, which is kind of like a sliding range depending upon how heavy the week is on one side or the other. And, but I have got to protect my time. Like, I mean, it’s the most important thing to me. Because if I spend too much time with the prospect that’s not qualified, then that’s time, that’s taking away time from a build or a process creation or talking to someone else who does have pain.

Al

So you just hit on something. And I’d like to know everybody, what’s your qualification process? How do you know that you’ve got a good prospect in front of you? That’s good. Because there’s the key to sharpen your sword?

John

Well, because that’s the thing I was gonna say a moment ago, and then we got sidetracked is that I don’t think that prospecting is the hardest thing to teach somebody. I think that the qualification side of things is harder to teach.

Al

There’s where I sink my teeth in.

John

And I think that salespeople get a bad name, because there’s this stigma of you know, the sales guy is going to sell anything. And it doesn’t really matter if we can do it or not, because they’re going to over promise, and then it puts a lot of pressure on on the backend team. That typically happens because that salesperson doesn’t have a good idea of what qualified actually means. Right? It might also be that they’ve got a shallow pipeline, and then you know, they’re just …

Al

They’re stabbing at everything.

John

Most times, it’s just there’s not a clear line of communication around, hey, you brought this in, it wasn’t really a good fit. Let’s figure out why this wasn’t a good fit. And that way, we could not deal with this shape.

Clint

Who are we talking about that situation? So you’re talking about working for somebody as a salesperson, you brought this in and somebody told you that it’s not a good fit?

John

Absolutely.

Clint

That’s, uh…

Al

Does that ever happen in your business?

Clint

Well, no, it doesn’t. It happens in my business. It doesn’t happen to me.

John

Of course not.

Al

Yeah. My point exactly.

Clint

The point of it is, is that… I

Al

I didn’t say that it was, that it did.

Clint

So, in my defense is that if, if my boss, who’s not a salesperson, or anybody above me ever told me that, I’ve failed my process.

John

For sure, but like, you’re not the norm, right? You’re the outlier, right? You’ve done so much work on yourself and your awareness. And then you’ve talked about that first year of you working for your company. Of just like sitting down and analyzing what clients and what partners make us money and which ones don’t? That’s not the norm.

Al

Okay, but wait a second, we’re talking to a bunch of people out there. So maybe we can sit here and pat ourselves on the back and be our own parade and we, you know.

Clint

Okay, yeah. So are we ready to move to me?

Nannette

We’re on you. Go ahead.

Al

Oh, no, I’m gonna look the other way. Now. Go ahead. Keep talking.

Clint

Do you have any more to add on on, as a C? So wrap, if you had to wrap it up? What do you…

John

Um, for, for me, it’s, you got to know when to cut bait. Right. And that’s not the easiest thing for me to do. Because I like to be a fixer. So if you come to me with this problem, oh man, like, like, let’s figure this thing out. So I’ve got to draw some awareness. And then I have to kind of poke and prod and see, you know, in a is any of this relevant to you?

Nannette

I think for a C and an S, it is hard to…

John

For sure. Right? Because I have facts. You told me that this sucks. Let’s fix it.

Nannette

Yeah, and I want it I want everything to be okay, as an S.

Al

Okay, but that’s like a bad girlfriend who’s got a complaint that just wants to hear, she just wants to talk?

John

Absolutely. But like, this is me trying to fight outside of my comfort zone. Right? Because I’m such a fixer that I will, that I will spend…

Clint

You’ll take anybody on.

John

I won’t now but it is in my wheelhouse that I…

Clint

For a high C out there listening, that, that’s, that’s your probably your biggest weakness that you will try to fix everybody’s problem and fail at all of them instead of focusing on one that you actually have a, you know…

Al

Even when they want you to go away, you’re like, but no, but I could help you, right?

John

I wrote a line in my, I’m a big fan of daily journaling. We haven’t really talked about that here, but we will eventually. But for probably a year straight I had to write this thing that I can’t help everybody and that doesn’t make me a failure. I get to spend time with people who are willing and able. Sure. And and eventually…

Al

That’s cool.

John

My, my mindset kind of shifted, but you know, it is in my wheelhouse, if I’m, if I’m stressed out…

Nannette

Repeat that so we can all write that down.

Al

Repeat that one more time, so people can hear that because that’s really good.

John

I, hold on. I can’t help everybody, and that’s not a failure. I have to spend my time with people who are willing and able.

Clint

Yeah

Al

I like it. Yeah.

John

Alright, so Clint, D, prospecting.

Nannette

Let’s all get a T shirt.

Clint

Absolutely. Team D t-shirts?

John

No, no, noone needs those.

Clint

I’ll buy four of em. Get one for Paul.

Fist pumping back there behind the soundstage.

So, prospecting. I, for okay, so let me go, let me skin this cat a little bit different than you guys did. Go back to your book of business. And look at the people you already do business with. So my very first prospect in my mind is not to go find prospects that we don’t already do work with. I think for me, the biggest gain is look at the people you already do business with and have you maximized that potential? Because that’s prospect, in my mind.

John

So okay, but isn’t that farming as opposed to hunting? Or, you know, if we’re going to use these cliched labels.

Al

Yeah, you got people coming out that don’t have a book of business. Nobody to do what you’re doing.

Cint

Let me rephrase. If you have a book of business, first rule on prospecting, in my mind, is to go back to who you’re already doing business with and, and good customers, and make sure that you’re maximizing potential. They’re step one, right. And I think if you do that,

Al

And that, that works, because some of you guys have inherited business, you’ve turned after somebody else. So you keep speaking. There are bigger implications there.

Clint

Sometimes you inherit stuff that you need to repair. Right? Oh, absolutely. They’re already a customer. Yeah, they’re just in the side. You know, you know that they do the work that you do, they know that you know that they need your services, that it’s been proven in the past by past data because they’ve done work with you right.

Nannette

All you need is one, and then you can do that.

Clint

So in my mind, I think step one is to like you said, John, farm, right? Make sure you’re producing maximum yield for your crop. That’s one area of prospecting for me that works well, in my in my industry. I don’t know if it is for everybody.

Al

Yeah, works in ours too.

Clint

Sometimes you’re a one off sale. You know, maybe you sell a CRM, John, that, that’s the only sale that I can make to em and they’re already using me on the one sale. I get that. My next my next point of that is if you’ve maximized that potential. Now I go for a very tactical, very deliberate focus on one person. I don’t focus, I don’t go to big…

Al

Stalker.

Clint

Yeah, maybe? Yeah, sure. Yeah. It is stalking. I stalk, what they do their business, what kind of jobs that they do, does that fit us? I qualify really hard in the prospecting phase. And I do that before I even make a phone call. Before I make an email, before I do anything. And I get as far as I can on the information highway. Whether it’s research, asking people in your in your business, commonality, common acquaintances that might know, LinkedIn, right? I know, I see that you know this guy. What do you know about these guys? What kind of business do they do? Do they pay well? Are they a good customer? Do they pay on time? All these things are questions I asked long before I even venture into chasing after somebody and prospecting. So step two for me is information highway, get as much as you can. And it’s out there. It’s all over. You just got to make some phone calls. And once you have that, now I’m looking at how well do you fit my business? right with that information that you’ve gained? How well do you fit my business? And is there enough information to make that comparison? If there’s not, now I need to make a phone call. Now I need to make an email. Now I need to have a sit down with somebody and qualify really, really hard. And all those really hard questions that most people are uncomfortable asking. In my personality trait, it’s not so hard. That’s why I say I think prospecting for me is very easy. Because I, I’m willing to walk into a conference room, and in two minutes willing to walk out of a future client. Yeah, it just, it just doesn’t.

Al

So why do you walk out?

Clint

Because they don’t qualify? So if I have…

John

So real quick, right? You know, so far in this episode, I feel like we’ve been talking about prospecting in a very nebulous sense, right? Not, not, not incredibly actionable, right. And so, Clint, when you’re going into this into this board meeting, like sure, like what’s the biggest thing that blows something up for you to where you’re like, you know what I gotta go?

Clint

Well, I’ll tell you right off the bat, because, because of who I am, is a very gut feel. I had a conversation today with an estimator and my boss in the same room about a project that they took on without me in the sales process. And I totally feel that this is going to be a bad job, going to be a bad partnership, it’s not going to go well for anybody. And they’re, they’re continuing to move on because they, okay, the data is there, they’re farming. My gut feel says it’s not all there. I’ve done my homework as well. It’s not there. So for me, step one, in that situation is gut feel. How do I connect with these people? Are they willing to give me the information I need to make this successful? Are they willing to get out of their comfort zone? In here, what I’m actually asking because I’m asking important questions. I’m not just asking the ask.

John

And these are internal people inside of your company, is that correct?

Clint

In that situation, yeah. Okay, these are, but if I’m, if I’m on a new call with somebody that says, hey, we’ve got a job, come look at it. We want you to come over to our office today and kind of do a meet and greet and see what you’re all about. The first thing everybody wants to do is present. Absolutely. This big look at the project we got. I want you guys to do all this. Okay, so first question that I would ask is like, so you guys are? Are you guys going out for two or three bids? Or five bids? Oh, yeah, of course. That’s our process. Well, it’s interesting, because you said you only wanted to use us. So I’m a little confused. You talked about partnership, maybe on the phone, or in this meeting, you talked about safety requirements, you talked about all these qualifications that you have for me, I also have those same qualifications back. And now I if you don’t mind, indulge me a little bit. But I have to ask those questions. Because if you don’t qualify the same way that you did to us, then I don’t know if this is a fit. And I want to get all that out there before we start talking about plans and drawings and yeah, and money.

John

So if this is your first episode, and in you and you’re not really sure, Clint works in construction. So, okay, you know, and, and that’s an important thing to talk about.

Clint

Yeah, it is. It’s a very…

Al

Legos

Clint

K’Nex. K’Nex would’ve been better.

Al

Makes these amazing things. They’re just beautiful.

Clint

But you know, I will say that I don’t always do the best at it. Sometimes I get a little bit of, you know, a little bit of…

John

I know, Clint just admitted a little bit of failure.

Clint

No, I have to back it up. Hold on.

Al

Somebody is gonna die tonight.

Clint

There, there are times where I get a little giddy. I see a big project.

Nannette

Oh my gosh!

Al

Did you just, giddy on top of I sometimes…

John

Yeah, you gotta drink after…

Nannette

And I’m drinking water obviously.

Al

We’re all talking over each other. That was a big moment guys.

Clint

What did you call it a long time ago? You said sales horny. You get sales horny. Right? You get happy feet. You see a big, big project in front of you. And somebody’s like, I you know, I think this is a $10 million project. And you’re like, oh man, 10 million bucks. That could be us. We could do this for sure. And you get blinded by that. “Could’ve been a contender.” But I’m dealing with a situation right now. Right now that’s $11 million deal. That’s a big deal for us.

Al

I feel something.

Clint

So that’s a big deal for us. that’s a that’s a six figure payday if everything goes right on the income side. Right. That’s it? That’s a bit sweet. Yeah. So so I can tell you right now that I actually had an internal meeting, and I said, Look, I know that they’re going to go out to bid against us. They’re going to use our competitors to try to get the best number. That’s okay. I’m not scared of that. But I also know that that company that’s hired this GC to go out and get those bids is also looking at other GC. So now we’re not one of three anymore, we’re qualified bidders now. One of 9. Yeah, so the the really messed up part is is phase one. This is phase two, phase one was about $6 million. And we did great for em.

Al

Oh, you did phase one?

Clint

We did phase one. They only went to us, they only bid to us, we gave them a fair price, we didn’t make a killing off of it. We knew that phase two is going to happen. We want to be a part of that. And you add those two together. Now you’re now you’re talking money. So we went in pretty conservative on the on the phase one. So my point is…

Al

My grandmother says you gave a little land Yep on the first one.

Clint

Yes, absolutely. She German?

John

Did you did you?

Al

Cajun.

John

Did you kind of set expectations around this idea of like of like, hey, look, we’re happy to give you a deal on phase one. But, you know, if we do that we’d like to really have the inside track on phase two.

Clint

Yes. I probably didn’t do that as well as I should, because I learned about phase two, a little bit down the road. Okay, so phase one to me wasn’t phase one. It was just the job. Okay. So right now, we’re about to enter into bidding process and negotiations. And now I have to go back on how they know me. And I have to reiterate this process, this very tough process that I can almost guarantee you, they’re going to disqualify themselves in my own process after about six questions.

Al

So what are you going to do?

Clint

And that’s tough, right, because that’s a prospect. A new prospect for job, whether it’s a job or new customer, it’s still a prospecting thing, in my in my sales projections for the year. So my some, so my hard part is, is that I’m probably gonna have to disqualify a $10 million job and walk away from it. And that’s going to be really tough for the C-level people in my company to hear.

John

So how do you, okay, so, going for the no is, obviously, or being okay with no is super important to being a salesperson? You’re obviously okay with a no right. And that just comes as part of being a D? How does that relate to the people in your company that are above you? Like, is there pressure like, hey, Clint, you need to close this deal.

Clint

Of course, it’s like, why would, why would you drop a $10 million deal? Clint, we did phase one.

Al

Yeah, my, yeah, that, I get where you’re coming from. But can you let go of it?

Clint

Easily.

Al

You can?

Clint

I, you know what, to be honest with you, I’d make a phone call and ask all these questions I’m about to ask and walk away from it without ever even seeing drawings on it.

John

Can we do that on the air? I’m just kidding.

Clint

That’d be interesting.

John

That would be super interesting.

Al

That would be so fun.

Clint

But my, one of my biggest…

Al

We’re going to do that one time, guys. We were literally going to do calls on the air. I’d love to. That’d be fun.

Clint

I’d love to get a hold of a gatekeeper on this.

John

You’re on the air. What about a pattern interrupt that what is huge pattern interrupt. You’re on the air on the air? Yeah, I’m on a sales show, you’re on the air right now.

Clint

So I know that I got a little deep into stuff on prospecting, I will say qualify really hard. I chase the 10% more than the 90%. The 10% qualified, I chase those people because I know that I have a lot better chance moving forward with that smaller community, then going out there and getting big numbers, bringing in volume. And getting a little bit off of it.

Al

It’s the 8020 rule.

And we’ve probably alluded to that and you guys out there, probably understand, yeah, 80% of your business can come from 20% of your prospects. And hone down, figure out what that looks like in your world. And get with it and look left and look right, look at the other people that, you’re not the only guy or gal out there selling or doing what you do. Find, don’t reinvent the wheel, find whoever’s doing it better than you and emulate, glean, understand. Take them out to dinner, ask for help.

John

Hold on, hold on. We’re going to wrap up. We could talk about this forever.

Clint

Give me, give me a second on the 80/20 rule because, because I have some insight today we’re, we’re a…

John

Should this be part of your throwdown?

Clint

No.

John

Okay, then go ahead.

Clint

This, this works very well on your at 80/20 comment, because right now we’re strategic planning for 2020. Who do we have in the pipeline? What’s our growth potential? We’re doing all those numbers right now. What’s funny is, is that I realized in my CRM yesterday, that I can actually do all of my yearly sales plus my growth with one of my customers.

Al

Oh, so you want to stand on a soapbox and tell us how good he was.

Clint

My point is, is that…

Nannette

Is everyone clapping?

Clint

I have 20 customers that I’m doing all that book of business with. What I’m saying is that you, you don’t always know your potential of your existing customers. Yeah. So…

Al

No, I knew, I knew where you were going.

Clint

Before you go out chasing chasing chickens around the yard, maybe look in your own kitchen, because there might be a chicken breast in the freezer.

Al

And then I’m going to call everybody out because that’s what you guys do. That’s, that, that is, that is half of sales. A bunch of chasing and nothing happening. In carlots, in industry, everywhere. You’re chasing, but you’re not getting anywhere, you’re making a living, right? But you’re not a superstar. You know, you’re not at the top of the list, you’re not on the board higher than that guy. So if that’s what you’re doing, and you guys all know, if you’re doing it or you’re not, I mean, it’s a radio, it’s a podcast.

John

So, so on that point, right. Like some companies just want to reward being busy, as opposed to being productive, right?

Clint

There’s a lot of companies out there like that.

John

So you know, sometimes you’re not in the right fit, right. And sometimes you might need to make a change to go work at a company that’s got a better sales culture than the one that you’re at. Because if you’re in this thing, where you’re just, you know, you’re taking bullshit meetings, you know, and then you’re, you’re filling out the CRM to like placate someone but you’re not moving anything forward. Yeah. Right. You’re time is better spent doing something else be more productive.

Al

But if you’re doing that you’re looking over your shoulder because they got some kid getting out of college. It’s about to replace your ass, right? If you’re not driving yourself, if you’re sitting there like the bump on the log, then that’s on you. Hey, I hope somebody takes your job.

Nannette

You gotta have a desire.

Al

Yeah, yeah, you’re one bucket of spit. You’re not out there making it because in this industry, you can live the lifestyle that you want to live, you can do the things that you want to do. You can put your kids in college, wherever they want to go. If you get up and you use some of the things that we talk about.

John

Show up every day.

Al

Well, but don’t just show up.

John

Well, yeah, show up, show up and run the program.

Al

Run the program.

John

Alright, so we’re at that time of the show, right, it’s time for the throwdown.

Al

Wow, love our guy behind the scenes.

John

Paul is all over it. Alright, so two minutes from the D, the I, the S, and the C. Clint the D, go.

Clint

Yeah. So on prospecting, I would say maximize your potential with your current customers base. Really make sure that you’re utilizing that because if you’re doing successful projects with the customer, make sure that you’re maximizing everything you can do with them first, then go search, right. And then once you’re searching, qualify really hard, be tactical, be deliberate, go in there with a plan of why you’re chasing this customer. And in the end, get all the insider information that you can get by asking, by referrals ,by social media accounts, by just online knowledge. Do that first, take a next step. And, and what, what I will say is to qualify hard, you’re going to have to ask questions. And those questions to every personality may not be easy, it’s easy for some versus others. If it’s hard for you, I’m sorry, but this is the game that we’re playing, and you’re just going to have to gut this shit. And you’re gonna have to get tough, and you’re going to have to get calloused. And you’re gonna have to ask these tough questions to get in there. Because otherwise, you’re going to be led with a big long foot chase, which is never going to end.

Al

Awesome. Al, our I.

Al

Well put. Look left, look right, look up, look down, look around yourself outside of the little, you know, the microcosm that you live in, and in the way you do business, to how other people are doing business, what their prospects look like, find, find people who are successful in your own industry, emulate their, their activities, have no fear, like Clint said, and and, and show up and perform. And and extend yourself and be be somebody that somebody wants to talk to. Be engaging, be head forward in, in the sense that you’re, you’re better than yourself, you know, it is a show in a certain sense. I mean, look at TV, be the best sitcom on the block.

John

Nan, our S.

Nannette

So I love analogies. So I’m going to use fishing, fly fishing. And I think the biggest thing is to persevere, like to get up every morning early. Don’t think, don’t be lazy. And if you want to be successful, you have to have desire. So create it. If you don’t go out there thinking you’re going to be a failure, have a great attitude. But with fishing, you have to know where to stand, you need to know how the waters flowing, you need to know where you’re going to throw your line, you need to know what bait to use. Know, have a plan. Be persistent. And don’t be a wimp, like do not. I can’t tell you how many people have just go, oh god, this is too hard. I just can’t. No. Be positive, know what you’re doing. Basically figure it out. That’s why listening to us is going to be helpful because you don’t think you can just go out there and walk anywhere and any office or any client and you’re going to capture. You better have a plan. And you better be persistent and be have guts.

Al

And if you catch no fish, kill your dog and have meat.

Nannette

Catch fish, have the right bait.

John

So for you C’s out there, this is not anything new. But build a process, right? Take the time to figure out how much you want to make. What’s important to you, set, set goals and then figure out what does an average client bring in? You know, how much of that goes to you? If you’re not an owner, you know, if you’re working for someone else, like what, what is the deal pay you up for commission, and then figure it out from there, right? It’s, it’s not sexy, it’s not super fun. But for me, the minute I did this and realized, oh, all I really need to have is like three decision maker meetings per week. And I’m going to, I’m going to make the money that I want to make. That takes all the pressure off of me and then I’m not caught in the paradigm of more. Of like, I need more, more business, more clients, more, more money, right? Because I’ve started with the end in mind. The other thing that I’ll say is figure out the commonalities and the people that you’re killing it for. And then narrow, narrow, narrow, narrow, narrow. Because I feel like your conversations are so much easier if you are very, very niched as opposed to the generalist, right, because no one no one wants to spend time with a generalist. But if you can be extremely relevant to one person because of you only work with this kind of client. I think that your conversations are a lot easier. So, awesome. Yeah. I, this is a great episode, and we could talk way more about prospecting and we will another time.

Al

Yeah, we’ll, we’ll circle back around.

John

For sure. So follow us on social media. Everything is at Sales Throwdown Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, if you’re watching this on YouTube, I hope you like my shirt, because it’s pretty dope today.

Nannette

I don’t know if you can tell. It’s, it’s camping. It’s firewood with flames.

John

Campfires, that’s right.

Clint

I thought it was rocket ships.

John

You know, sometimes you see what you want to see.

Al

It’s his Girl Scout uniform.

Clint

It’s our, it’s our song. Right?

John

So yeah, follow us. If you’re watching us on YouTube. Subscribe.

Clint

Hashtag your team, Team D.

John

Yeah, there’s not a lot of those.

Yeah, if you get any value out of this thing, Team P, for if you’re Paul, behind the mic.

Al

Little shout out to man with a plan.

John

He’s making these tones so, so amazing.

Clint

So I know the age that we live in on the social media, which we’re putting out there, is you guys are going to give us your comments, but we’re really looking forward to it. Absolutely. I want to hear what you have to say about prospecting, your do’s and don’ts, what works, what doesn’t. Because hey, we’re learning too, right? Yeah, put that stuff on on social media.

John

Yeah, put that stuff on social media. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram.

Al

Yeah, get with us. We want to hear.

John

Yeah, we’ll see everybody next week.

Nannette

Bye ya’ll.