Episode 1: DISC Overview Video

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John

Alright, this is the pilot episode. And what we do is we talk about the framework that we’re using to know ourselves and how to be successful in sales roles. And so you’re going to hear from Clint, and Nannette, and Al, and myself, talking about where we struggle, where our personal nature limits us and how we have to work to get past that. Things that I want you to think about is that these are not fixed, you can build upon these, but they’re important to be aware of because pressure will make you revert. So listen to that. I hope you get a ton out of it. If you get any value out of it, please share it with someone else that you know and sales, follow us on social media, and enjoy the show.

Announcer

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the main event. In the D corner we have clint the cleaver Bigelow. In the I corner, we have Al the gambler, Daniel, in the S corner, we have Natalie the promoter Fallman, in the C corner, we have John Small Mountain Hill.

Let’s get ready to Throwdown!

John

Welcome to the show everybody.

We are going to be talking a little bit about why we’re here and why you should be listening to us. You know, we’re all salespeople. And we’re really, we’ve worked really hard to kind of understand ourselves, because that’s where success ultimately leads to and sales, you’ve got to be able to communicate with people meet people halfway. set expectations appropriately. And a lot of that starts with understanding your comfort zone, how you approach situations and conversations.

Nannette

Relationships.

Clint

Who you are as a person, who your customer is a person.

John

Absolutely. So the way that we do that. And the way that a lot of the sales teams around the world do it is using an assessment called DISC. Right. Four different quadrants D I S and C. And you just happen to have all four of those people here we got Clint, who’s our D, D stands for dominant.

Clint

The D.

John

The D. Al is our I.

Al

whoa, whoa, whoa. Guys strap in, this is going to be a ride that you’re going to run on. Right. So I appreciate the calmness of your introduction. But if you’re not getting with this group, then you’re losing and losing out man.

John

How textbook of I.

Al

You’re one step behind the game and you hadn’t even figured it out. So listen up.

John

Yeah, I stands for influencer.

Nannette

Did that influence you?

John

Yeah, we’ll talk a little bit more about that.

Clint

Or as Nannette says, what do you say?

Nannette

You brought it up sweetheart, you tell us.

Clint

Ignorant.

Al

Moving on John

John

The next on that is S which stands for steady motivator, which is Miss Nannette. And then I’m the C and C’s are compliance.

Clint

Boring.

John

By boring you mean awesome, we get shit done.

Nannette

Very awesome.

John

And so let’s talk a little bit about D’s. Right? Because they’re the first one in the acronym.

Nannette

If not we don’t talk about them first. They’re all whiny.

John

That’s true.

John

So D’s are you know that that dominant title is pretty legit there, you know, you guys are task driven, love to get shit done. You don’t need all the details. It needs to happen, or you need to move on.

Clint

Yeah, gut driven. You know, like to make a decision kinda off the handle, we get some of the facts. So we are task driven. So we get some of the facts, but we’d like to, you know, just dive in and say, let’s get the shit done today. What does it take to get this done now? Yeah, there’s a lot of pros and cons to that. We’ll dive into that deeper. Yeah, absolutely.

John

I’s are the center of attention. Right there. storytellers. They are wildly exaggerating in all instances.

Al

You know, I think you’re little off base there.

Okay, I think we only want to take things as far as you will believe them, right?

Clint

Hey, Doc, why don’t you tell us a story about it?

John

Yeah, that’s true. They’re the sociable people.

Nannette

Sometimes they’re Bellman.

John

That’s true. They are sometimes bellman.

John

We’ll talk more about that eventually.

Nannette

Successfully.

John

S’s are team focused, they want what’s best for the team, everyone’s got to feel good about it. It’s got to be like a really good fit. And not just for them. It’s more about like the culture and the impact of the end result for everybody involved and less about them. So because of that, they don’t run towards conflict straight ahead. Al’s got something to say?

Al

Well, I think it if there’s a definition of sort of passive aggressive, and I don’t mind that, I think that that S’s, the last thing they want to show you. Is that aggressive side? Sure. But if, but if there worth their salt, right, if they’ve had some success in this world, they’ll bow up on you and bite you in the ass in New York minute.

John

Have you ever done that, Nan?

Nannette

I have

John

Interesting. We’re gonna talk about that. Because I’m really curious.

Yeah, rounding that out is the C, right. C is also task driven. But unlike the D, we’re not gut focused, we are very factual focused. And so because of that, I always know my facts. And if I don’t, I don’t really have a lot to say, and in a sales role, that leads to being kind of slow to start, you know, I need to know enough.

Clint

Well, you also won’t talk unless you know the facts. So it’s not that you’re not willing, you just don’t know the facts. So therefore…

Nannette

Processing

Al

But again, I gotta call you to the carpet on the fact that so I call my accountant who’s quite the See, right? I’m in Vegas. I’m at the tables. And I get rolled up on with we need yourself security number, right, because I’ve gone in and out too many times. They had me down for like these big wins that I’d really didn’t have. But I was prone to just go take my chips back to the cage. So long story short, I call my accountant. I’m like, What the fuck? I told the guy to fuck off. Right? You can’t have it Give me your Social Security. Right? And he wouldn’t. I’m like, see, see what I mean? It doesn’t feel very good. So I go over in the guy says, No, they’re just filing a form. This is my accountant. So immediately, he goes to guns with no, you’re fine. You’re safe, so a good C that knows his stuff knows how to calm guys like me down. Right? Like, chill out. You got this? Because he’s given me the facts of the equation. And to say that you don’t know, you usually know, man.

John

Yeah, okay.

Clint

You have a better opinion than most because you’ve researched some shit.

Al

Or what you’ll say, not to interrupt. But what you’ll say is, here’s what I know about that. And you know, a lot of things about that, right?

John

Sure. I guess, yeah. Okay.

Al

Yeah. So don’t sell yourself short.

Clint

Jesus Christ, his headphones won’t fit after this is all over?

John

Well, that, that brings up an important point that we’re talking about comfort zones and natural, natural comfort zones, right? Once you know, where you struggled, and you can work on making that part of your comfort zone, right. And we’ve all done that, which is why being C it’s not super natural for me to be here talking with you guys, or to do networking or to go to business development, like that was so far outside of my comfort zone, I had to build accountability and systems and processes around all that stuff, or else it would never get done. So the way, where as Al, right Al can network with anybody. He just walks in a room and just like, hey, strikes up conversations, right? I’ve seen you do it.

Al

If you bring enough hundred dollar bills, you can get through anything.

John

But I don’t have that skill set. And so it wasn’t until, like I started networking, and I had a goal for networking, I just want two cards, I just want two cards of things that I should follow up on. That made it easy, then I’m just like, I’m running a task at that point. It’s crazy. Right? Now my comfort zone is I’m okay with it. Right? I can speak in front of groups. I’m here obviously, my network all the time. So it’s it’s knowing that shortcoming and then understanding how you build it into your comfort zones that we just something you do. And it doesn’t tax and wear you out.

Clint

You said something about, you know, kind of seeing your short side or your weaknesses, it’s also just knowing about your strengths as well. And also the weaknesses and strengths of who you’re talking to.

John

Yeah, that’s what DISC really pushes. And that’s what we really learned out of all of this is, is to look at somebody across the table from you and say, okay, they have this communication style, I have this, we have to meet in the middle or adapt one way or the other. To get along.

Al

Can we back up just here because some of these folks out here listening to us, or watching maybe going DISC, right? And I think it just worth explaining, you did explain it. But initially, everybody fits into a category, right? That we’re not all the same, sure, but that we all have their similar patterns that have been developed or seen out there. So you guys out there listening, what we’re talking about is the powers that be and it wasn’t sitting at the table, correct, came up with a system that a lot of people seem to find valid. That places four quadrants, right. And so if you had a square and you took a cross, and you put it in there, and divided into four quadrants, each one of us that you hear on the mic or see on the TV fits into one of those quadrants. And then the struggle is how we communicate with each other. Absolutely, and how we, because you’re only a quarter of the population, and maybe even less, because some people are packed a little more densely into one quadrant than another. So if you’re out there dealing with your family, dealing with your job, dealing with the people that you work with, what we’re hoping to bring, or what we know we’re going to bring to you guys is some clarity on why I didn’t understand that guy, right. what the hell just happened in that conversation.

Nannette

Well, it will help you identify where you are. Are you D? Are you listening to this? This very short segment so far have you thought, oh, that kind of sounds like me, and then identifying that, and how you’re going to go forward dealing with identifying your client, it’s really important because if you just haphazardly go into an office, you have no idea what your plan is, you have no goal of how you’re going to react, it’s really vital to understand if you’re a D and I and S or a C. So that’s what our our whole objective here is to identify that and show you how we have succeeded going forward with that. And it’s worked. It’s very advantageous.

Clint

And also failed.

Nannette

Yeah. We all fail. Everyone fails.

Clint

I don’t I don’t want to have a silver bullet for sure. I don’t I don’t want to knock you off your bike. Because Because we have also failed because we’ve got it wrong. So I do that all the time. People ask me, what do you think that guy is? I say, he’s an I, you know, he’s an I/S. No, his profile shows a D. And I’m kind of blown away with that. But I learned a lot of why he is what he is. And I think I think as we go through this episode, we got we got started talking about what a D is and I in S and C is and what those buzzwords are of why we are that way. And we’re going to start getting into that here in a second.

Al

Well, John, walk us through the the general premise of who symbolizes a D. So maybe they could really, you know, understand then who’s and I meaning, you know, General?

John

Sure, yeah, before we do that, I’m going to reference something that Clint said, you know, he said, and is right, most people have got a secondary letter, right, like, sure, and that has a huge impact. You know, if you’re looking at someone who is primarily and I was some D, versus someone who’s with a little bit of I, there are differences between those two personalities and those two people and how they’re going to perform and where those comfort zones are. So you’ve got a primary letter, and then you have a follow up, right. And once again, I can’t make this clear enough, this is not set in stone, right? But look at what happens when you’re uncomfortable under pressure, stressed out, or in like a new environment, because that is where all of this stuff starts to really showcase itself.

Clint

Well, and all information is good information. So the more you have of it, the better the judgment that you can make. So if you’re going out there blind already, and you’re walking into a door, and you don’t know anything about the person you’re about to talk to, if you if you know nothing about them, that conversation is a lot harder than if you start seeing little ticks of what makes them work. And you can categorize them and understand how to communicate with them, from your personality to them. That is what DISC does for you.

Nannette

Right. So to use an analogy. So if you it’s kind of the oil and vinegar thing. So if you’re an I and you go to a C, the I’s like all flamboyant, and just like fun stuff, and the C’s going, man, I just want to know numbers, I want to know details. So there it’s a little oil and vinegar, the same thing with a D and an S. You know, I’m like, how are you? Is everything great? I hope everything’s wonderful, because I really want that. He just is like, quit talking like he’s irritated with.

Clint

You’re talking about me.

Everyone

Yeah. So dominant.

Nannette

But I will tell you, the initial conversation that got all of this going was the D and the S having the conversation we we we just meshed we went OH, because we figured it out very quickly, because we had already learned a lot about this. So that’s, again, the whole purpose of this is how to figure out how to identify who you are, how to mesh with your opposite, or are not just your opposite, but definitely your opposite, you’ve got to know that.

Clint

So so let’s let’s dig in pretty quickly here of what DISC is. Let’s start explaining what a D I S and C truly is. For those folks that are out there listening. I don’t care where you start. John, I know you’ll lead this because you’re a C, you know, hopefully you start with a D because we’re most important.

John

In your opinion.

Clint

in my opinion.

John

Well, so to touch on one thing, the name really talked about is you have adjacent sections, right? So like D is in that top right hand corner, and then I is under that S is next to that. And then C is there. So as a C, it’s really easy for me to move to and and understand S’s and D’s it’s really hard for me to understand is right. And so we’ve all got that polar opposite, which is what Dan was talking about a moment ago.

Al

Which brings up an interesting comment because you and I talked about that.

Nannette

Did you say interesting?

Al

Interesting. Sorry, did I stumble? It’s a weird little saliva in my mouth. Sorry.

boogers in the nose maybe.

Clint

It’s not saliva.

John

Back on topic.

Al

So remember the phone call I had to you? Right? Early on.

John

Talking about DISC?

Al

Yeah, talking about this, sitting down.

John

Your and my version of how this started is obviously a little bit different than Nan’s version of how it started.

Al

Spotlight and put it right in her face.

John

I wasn’t gonna bring that up. But I am glad you did.

Nannette

No idea what ya’ll are talking about.

Clint

Like I love Nan’s version because it involves me.

Al

So John,why don’t you tell the true story about how this started?

John

Yeah, so we were at a sales conference. One of the sessions was, for lack of better term, a little bit redundant. So we were out sitting by the pool, not working, just drinking. And Nan was working through a problem.

Clint

I was working.

John

And a Nan had a problem. And she asked for some help.

Nannette

And can we identify the problem? That sounds so….

John

Nan had a problem with the prospect.

Nannette

Okay, thank you.

Al

Yeah, sales, a sales problem.

John

Yeah, a prospect that gone dark on her is what had happened. And we were kind of in problem solving mode, trying to help her out. And my advice is a little different from Clint’s. But he saw value in mine and vice versa. And we started to go back to the original point of the problem, right? Because it’s easy to blame it on the prospect. But how much ownership are you taking over? True? How you got to that point?

Clint

Yeah. And even in that fact, I think that, John, if I remember correctly, John was like, okay, that’s an interesting way to look at things. And I said, I can’t believe you just said that. I cannot believe you said that to a customer. That’s crazy to me. But that’s very explains a lot about our personalities, but also as two very different outlooks on what an S said to another person. So that’s kind of how this whole premise got started. Like, wow, there’s some value in here in the other personalities talk about how you should talk to our personality.

John

Yeah, because I’ll say stuff to prospects that I will then try to say to Clint, and almost like a joking manner. Yeah. And his eyes roll so hard.

Clint

Or I do the the audible, like, the thumb in the pinky hang out. Yeah, this is over.

John

And that’s, that’s really kind of how this started, because I can’t talk to Clint the same way that I would talk to Al if they’re both my prospects, right? That, that I, gotta I gotta give him room to tell the stories and to have a ton of rapport and a ton of trust. And the D is just like, how do we make the best use of your time today?

Nannette

So yeah, yesterday was so hilarious. Clint was like, if someone tells me something’s the best, I hate them. I was like, What? And he’s like, if someone tells me, that’s the best coffee I’ve ever had, he’s like screw em, I will never drink. And I’m like, What? when someone tells me, that’s the best coffee, I’m like, Man, I’m like buying it. I can’t wait to try it.

John

I thought that was hilarious.

Al

It’s true. And that’s the example that we hope to show, right? That with specificity…

talking to you the four corners of the quadrants that you’re going to be dealing with out there.

Clint

That’s really interesting that you bring up that the story, because let’s put that into your, what you actually sell. So if you sell construction, and you go into a, which is what Clint sells, by the way. Yeah. So if you go into a room and you’re selling construction to a high S, like yourself Nannette, and you say this is…

Al

What you saying? Did you just say two S’s in construction?

Clint

Maybe.

Good luck with that.

Good luck with that.

Clint

But if I talked to you about how you know features of benefits and we’re great, and we love safety, and we love all of the things now use those big buzzwords like love and passion and I do these things? You’re, You’re…

Nannette

You are hired baby.

Al

Foreman just tried to run him over.

Clint

But if I’m sitting across from myself, and I mentioned those words, those features and benefits, and all those things that sound great on paper, but don’t actually happen. I hang the phone up. In this conversation, I’m done with you. You didn’t tell me anything about you said would everybody said seven times before you In the same interview, right? You’re trying to get this job. So is everybody else, they’ve all said the same thing. What this does, and what this podcast will really help you with is differentiating yourself, not in a way that’s fake. But understanding who you are, as a person, understand who you’re talking to. And getting that clear communication, equal business stature, all of those things out there. But you can’t do that if you don’t understand who you are as a person, and who your customer is as a person. On the personality spectrum.

John

I agree completely.

Nannette

I have to agree as well.

Al

Because information is power. Right? In every that’s a cliche, and say it with some zest. Because if, before I knew all of this, before, I knew all this, right? I just go in and vomit. Yeah, you know, I just do a little happy dance. I’d get a Hey, that’s great. And I would think that.

Clint

Everybody does, every personality here does has failed, succeeded sometimes because it does work.

Al

Well. Yeah, one needle in the haystack. Then you think oh my god, I’m on to riches. I got, I’m buying the jet.

Clint

Not to cut you off. But I will say that everybody listening out there, if you’re identifying with one of us four, we all have done that. It’s not it’s not a personality trait thing. We’ve all puked features and benefits.

Nannette

And can I ask? Clint, can you put your fingers in your ear when I make this statement? There is not any, the D, the I, the S, no one’s better than anybody else. I know the D…

Clint

Bullshit.

John

So let’s talk, okay, so I didn’t mean to cut you off Nannette. But this brings up like, a huge point is that until you know this, and you understand that there are other ways to sell and you can be your authentic self. You’re just out there running around and you see guys like Grant Cardone. And you’re like, Man, that guy’s awesome. Want to be just like him? Well, if you’re not like Grant Cardone, you have imposter syndrome, you think you’re you think you’re less, lesser? You know, and you can’t be successful in a sales role. And that’s just not true.

Nannette

It’s not true.

John

Al looks like he wants to argue with me.

Al

No, I don’t I think I agree with exactly what you’re saying. But if you think you want to be somebody else could walk with that, be yourself. But learn a process sure deliver who you are, with the respect of who you’re speaking to, because they’re buying.

Clint

I agree, you can be an actor, you know, two or three hours out of the day, you can’t do that 24 hours a day, your natural self will always come back.

John

You’ll get burnt out.

Al

Yeah, well, are your prospects going to catch you? Yeah, they’re gonna catch you not being the way you were pretending to be.

John

It comes across on a level that they’re not even aware of it.

Al

And how many years, slit my wrist? How do you go through life like that?

Clint

Well, there’s a really interesting thing about about traditional sales of where, I have to do whatever the customer wants to do. Right? I have to, I have to, oh, he likes to go to the restaurant and have a captain and coke. So I have to enjoy that as well. That’s not true. You can absolutely say, hey, that’s what you enjoy, I enjoy something else. And we can still get along. In a simple sense of what I’m talking about. You can do that, as well as at the conference table and a business meeting, in negotiations. You like this? I like that. I think we’re that, that we both have valid points, we have to come to some understanding. But you can’t do that if you always agree with somebody and you’re, you’re sliding to their side completely. You have to hold your own nature.

Al

Well okay. And to take that point one step further. You don’t have to go headbutt the guy, you just simply have to ask the right questions. Yes. Oh, absolutely. Because if you’re trying to make a stand that I’m an individual, when some guy says, Come be part of the crowd.

Clint

Look, to a personality like me, I shut you down when you try to do that.

Al

Yeah, absolutely.

Clint

There’s tact to do that.

Al

Probably the wrong thing to do. But if I say, Clint, my God, that’s, that’s amazing. How did you learn to drink whiskey straight out of the bottle? I mean, right.

Nannette

And I think it’s really important, I think this creates genuineness, you’re not just going in there faking it, like you’re going to be you, you’re going to let them be them. But you’re going to know how to move it work between the two of you, not just going in BSing someone that that’s who wants to sound like that, that that’s they don’t want to receive it, I don’t want to read, I don’t want to deliver it.

John

So I’m gonna talk about the thing that I see all the time in different online groups and things like that. And everyone is hung up on this idea of you got to provide value, right? And hanging. Like, that’s important. But people take it wrong, right. And for a lot of people, it’s making assumptions and doing free work and giving away free knowledge and doing these things that can lead you down a path of losing a prospect or giving away too much information. Value, sometimes is just showing up and listening.

John

It’s giving people what they want.

Clint

Sometimes, if you’re a successful business, you already have value. Absolutely. You hip pocket that. Yeah, and what you’re trying to do is find a lot of reasons, them telling you, not me telling you that as a salesperson, you’re trying to find out a lot of reasons why you should do business with me, because I bring value to the table. Right? So the only way to understand that we could go in very deep into this conversation. I won’t right now, ask a lot of questions, find out a lot of pain, dig deep, but the only way you can do that correctly, in my mind, is to understand who you are personality wise, understand what makes you tick and understand on the opposite side. What makes them tick. Absolutely. And, and and I think what we’re talking about today, as far as DISC, DISC allows you, it’s a platform, right? platforms, a kind of a buzzword in these days, have a place to go to and find out who you are, why you are the way you are, how to sell across spectrums to other people, it gives you tools to do that. That’s what DISC does for me.

John

Yeah. I would agree with that. For me, it’s way more cuz I’m fact driven, right? So I look at that. And I look at those results. I’m like, this is where I’m going to be weak, right? I’m not kicking down every door with like, reckless abandon like Clint is going to as a D, you know, I’m not, I’m not always going to thrive and seek out trying to be the center of a group of people like Al would, you know. So, when I look at it, I don’t, I think we look at it differently. And I think that this is pretty telling you about our personalities is because I look at that. And I’m like, cool. How can I build that? How can I How can I make sure that I’m getting out of my comfort zone and building this in as part of my process? And how important are those things? Because some of it I don’t see is super important. Because I think a D is totally fine doing a very high pressure close, which is not my style, because I don’t buy that way.

Clint

It’s stress to you?

John

Well, it’s not it’s not stress, it’s I’ve already made a decision. Right? By the time that I pick up the phone, and I call someone I’ve done so much damn research, that’s interesting. I’m already calling you because I see value in having a conversation with you. So if you’re trying to force a close on me, that’s never going to work. So just set better expectations. Hey, what happens after this call, I’m gonna sit down, and I’m gonna think about it and make sure that this is the thing I want to do. How long does that take? Right, at least then you’re farming or you’re farming for like a next step, and you’re not pressuring me to the next step? Because that’s not going to get you anywhere with someone like me. It’s not gonna get any anyone with you, either.

Clint

Well, it’s very different, you know? So my mindset is I’m gonna bust on the door, kind of like what you said and say, Look, I’ve done the research. I’ve consulted some people, this is the best situation for you. If you don’t listen to me, you are a dumb ass. That’s kind of a different perspective. Right?

John

Yeah, for sure.

Clint

And then in this very telling across the spectrum, because we are across the spectrum, we’re both driving the task, but we have different reasons why we’re doing that. I’m driven saying, Look, I’m telling you trust me, I’m right. You’re saying, here’s all the facts and 100 line items in a spreadsheet of why I’m right. Very different.

Al

And I’m thinking I’m losing a kidney somewhere with this whole process. Trust me, this drink this and take the coin ride, yeah, I mean it at a certain level, if you’re not gauging the person across from you, a knowing where they sit on the spectrum of, you know, how they by how they how they like to be spoken to. And you yourself, Clint, for those of you not watching, you know, I’ve spoken to this, you have to be able to slide within your personality. Yeah. Right. You have to be able to be a dynamic enough to go towards the position of the person that you’re trying to sell to.

John

Yeah.

Al

If you’re not willing to do that, you should probably shouldn’t be in sales, right?

John

Yeah, well, because we, you bring up a really good point, because we are hard wired to trust people who sound like us communicate the same way as us, and not like actually look like us, but kind of seem like us.

Clint

And the more and the more stressful that situation gets, we naturally slide back to where we’re comfortable, which is our natural selves, right? So that happens a lot in sales as salespeople, every every situation is a little stressful, right? Trying to close a deal trying to make the quota trying to do these things, we get stressed out and we slide the opposite way of what we should, right. So we so if I’m a if I’m a if I’m a D.

John

And you are

Clint

Very much. Right, thank you. So that’s not a what if question. I am a D!

Clint

I do so, you know, so if I’m in a situation with an I, and I feel that it’s uncomfortable in a situation to adapt to an I, so so I do the opposite, and I slide to a corner D, I ruin that relationship, I ruin it. I ruin everything that I could actually do less stressful by adapting a little bit of what he is or she is as an I to say, Okay, let’s move this process along. I still have to be task driven because I have to bring them to my level a little bit. But you once again, I’m going to say it over and over in this episode. You cannot do that if you don’t know who you are. And who they are.

John

Yeah, true for sure. You know, uh, speaking about the gut driven thing. There’s there’s a guy that Clint and I follow and his name’s Jocko. And He always talks about this metaphor of…

Clint

Jocko Willink. Serious.

John

So Jocko makes this comment all the time. And to me, it’s the it’s the it’s the purest illustration of like, what gut what gut driven is, he is talked about this idea that if he’s on a plane, even if that plane is going to go down, he’s confident he’s not going to die. Yeah, right. Whereas me being fact-driven and I’m like thinking about the numbers like, man, No one, no one survives. Crashes really.

Clint

See, Jocko is he’s kind of, I’ll say with me, because I think we’re two peas in a pod. Look, there’s not a lot of people that think that way. You’re a small majority on that plane or small minority on that plane is not a ton of days, most people are going to are going to naturally go to their stressful environments, and they’re going to react in the way that feels natural to them. Not a lot of people can adapt another way of thinking in a short stressful time. In for instance, a plane crash, right. So if you’re a worrywart, if you’re a person that freaks out about everything, and you let stress get to you, a plane crashes, the worst environment for you know, for a guy like myself, I’m the opposite way.

Nannette

I have no idea what you could even be thinking in a plane crash.

Clint

There’s nothing you can think other than hope to God, I live. And I have enough confidence in myself that I survived this because God wouldn’t, God wouldn’t do this to me. I have a reason for living. But the point of it is, is that I have a strong will. And I’m willing to understand that there’s a 1% chance that I might live, and I can’t, but I chased a chase the 1% not the 99% of failure. You know, go ahead.

Al

Well, I’m going to bring up one of my observations is you have more pretenders that are D’s, right? Sure. And then we’re that hits right there. There. They’re wetting themselves. Oh, no, they’re crying for Jesus Christ.

Clint

That explains a lot about their natural self. And we’re talking about this too, doc says this great point. So a lot of people pretend to be this certain person in sales roles.

Al

You’re the superhero, the big guy, right?

Clint

Not even a D. But as a C, like, I’m a fact guy. I love facts. You know, that’s, that’s what motivates me until you get hit with the hard question of, Okay, give me the facts. And then you go to that stressful situation. So as salespeople we often we, I think we’ve dived into this a little bit in our episodes before of D I S and C, we, we have a tendency, we have a ten… what?

John

You know what.

Clint

I know, we have it, we have a tendency to…

John

Clint’s gonna get fined.

Clint

We have a tendency to go back to our that two hour window of what our professional life is, but not the 22 hour window of who we truly are, for sure. So when that stressful situation comes along, we tend to dive back into that 22 hour window of who we are as a person, not as a professional.

Al

But the hope here is that everybody learns who they are or accepts the fact that they need to stay in their zone to be the best person that they are, right? Because me I’m saying, what will Oh, don’t hit me in the face, right? I know, you’re about to punch me, don’t do it in the face. And this is honestly, like, I’m about to get my ass kicked, the reality comes into play. And some people are going to live in that state of denial, or they’re going to be tougher than they want to be. It’s okay to just cry when you need to cry, run when you need to run. But man up if you can, right.

Clint

So, so really important to be on that that topic in DISC. There are no weak personalities.

Al

Absolutely. That’s a great statement right there.

Clint

There are no wrong personalities. There’s no strong personalities.

Nannette

I completely agree.

Al

You’re only strong if you realize who you are, and can adapt to the person across the table from you, to speak to, that strength in DISC. But there’s no weak.

John

Yeah, if you’re…

Clint

What I was saying is, is an S and a C, may seem weak to a D and an I.

Nannette

Why?

Clint

Well, perceptual, but it’s perception. And perception is is what 99% reality, right. And so the problem is, is that we have to get past that you’re this person, so you’re weak, or I’m strong, you have to get past that you have to dump that. And the way you do that is to understand the way the other person thinks because they are, look, when you’re dealing with people in a professional world, they’re obviously successful, because they’re sitting across the table from you, right now that most cases, most cases, right, they may be starving, they may be a little bit hungry. They may be a lot of other things, but they’re successful, otherwise, they wouldn’t have a job, period. So if they’re successful sitting across the table, and they’re an opposite personality from you, what power it is to understand what you are and what they are and make something work together. That opens a lot of doors.

Al

But for sake of specificity, right?

Al

You can grab somebody and, maybe we should, talk about, you know, a Donald Trump’s a D, right? As much as you may love him or hate him. Right. He has his issues. But that’s exactly where he said, Yeah, right. And then you have Mother Teresa, who’s an S, right, let’s take those two polar opposites. But to run an orphanage in Calcutta with limited resources, that woman had to have balls.

Clint

Yeah. You know, she had to adapt different personalities… in different situations.

Al

She had to decide and…

Nannette

She probably didn’t have balls, she had passion.

John

Tomato, tomato.

Al

But the woman had some grit to be able to go in and get things done.

Clint

And that’s not natural.

Clint

What you’re saying is that’s not natural to Mother Teresa.

Al

I think it was that passion. She knew where her compassion lied. Now, did she think about some of the decisions she had to make? Did it hurt her heart? Sure. But at the end of the day to feel that pain and be able to move past it. If you’re a D, and you bottle that up? You can’t tell me your hearts never hurt before, right?

Clint

No, because I because I can tell you for me to have compassion. What we’ve said this before on this is like, you mentioned the word love. And I’m like, Oh, what is this love that you speak of? What is this? Please explain? Because? Because I but it’s not. It’s just me. Right? So having compassion is really hard for me to slide versus an S that has tons of compassion, and needs to tell you the hard truth is the exact same slide that I have to compassion. Tough on both sides. Yeah. So the point of all of that is, is that when you have to make those tough slides, which is exactly what we have to do in sales conversations, when somebody is opposite personality from you across the table, you have to do that. And you have to do that professionally. And the way you do that is to recognize who they are. And you see commonalities and the goal in the end game.

Al

And a process, and a process to get there.

Clint

But that’s that’s what we’re talking about, sales people, you have to look at that person sitting across from you and who you are and say, Okay, look, we both agree on this. Let’s chase that avenue for a minute and see where we come out.

John

But so to boil this down to like a, like a nice little point is that if you’re a hiring manager, and you’re looking for someone, it’s not about they’ve got to be in certain areas or spectrums or anything else. It’s how, how coachable are they, how teachable, how hungry? Absolute, right, because I’ve known a ton of people that are in that golden area that a lot of people are looking for of the I with the D. And like they’re not coachable. So they’re not open to learning something else, you know, so it’s not about the certain personality type. It’s about, you got to take other things into consideration, right? Because for instance, right? Al and Clint, and Nan, they’re all in very long selling cycles, right? I mean, Al and Nan will talk to a doctor for seven or eight months, sometimes a year and a half. I mean, longer than that, sometimes before they get a shot to do any business together. And because they’re people driven. It’s ideal for them. Now, Clint, you have long selling cycle as well. And as a D, I would not, man, I would be a little bit concerned hiring a D for a very long selling cycle, because they’re not the best at nurturing and managing long term relationships, right.

Clint

However, if you put that in a task orientation of, hey, 12 months from now, this, this reward is going to be great for you as a D, and I accept the fact that it’s a task. Dude, I’ll put in all the work that needs to be done. Whether it’s 12 months, 18 months, three days, it doesn’t matter to me because I have a task. But you have to realize that I have in endgame. I have a reason that I’m doing all of this. It’s not for while I’m going to do all this and maybe they might buy from me. That’s a different story, because I’ll drop that shit in a heartbeat.

John

So it’s something like networking.

Clint

I love networking.

John

Why?

Clint

If you do it right, you’re the most powerful person in the room.

Al

Well put. No, but I mean, that’s a true statement.

John

No, no, I mean, I mean, it makes a ton of sense in hearing him say that. I’m like, Okay, yeah, like, that’s, that’s the only reason you would like it though.

Clint

Like, if I’m gonna go around and throw 10 business cards on the table and say, Hi, how are you? My name is Clint. Okay. You don’t want to listen to me, and I walk away. That’s some weak ass shit. In my in my mind, you know, you walk in and you’re like, dude, bro, the parties here. Shots line him up. Let’s go. Let’s talk about this stuff. Let’s get it all out on the table. What do you do? What do you do? Why do you do that? What do you do? Because that’s one thing about a D is I’m going to ask you some tough questions. Those questions are going to really reveal a lot about you. But what will be left with after the smoke clears of all those stuff questioning, right, wrong and different? Not saying that’s the right way to do it. But when I get done asking 100 people a bunch of tough questions, and I’m left with three. That’s my that’s my team. That’s my team that I want to go forward with. In a sale cycle, also, you should do this, I think. When you’re met with 100 prospects, that amount, that, ask hard questions. And when you’re left with three prospects that answered your questions correctly, honestly, truthfully, deep down from their gut, and they give you all this information, those are the three that you chase, not the 97.

John

Yeah, so what you’re talking about right there just qualifying people.

Clint

It is right.

John

And like, I think that’s the Lost Art.

Clint

It is and and a D, if you’re a D out there listening, you have all the tools already in your gut to do qualifying better than anybody. It because it comes naturally.

John

I’m going to disagree with you on that point, but we’ll talk about it a little bit. Let’s move on and talk about I’s and Al specifically, right, because most of the people that Al talks to are doctors, right? Al’s in medical sales. And those guys are like me. We need, I need a lot of information. I need a lot of details. I need all of that stuff.

Al

They’re all, but they’re a lot like everybody, except for me. Usually. Yeah, we have some S’s we have some compassionate healthcare givers. Exactly. Then you can…

Clint

You can’t be a doctor not care about people.

John

Yeah, I disagree.

Al

You can, you can be a technician. Yeah.

Al

Oh, that’s interesting. Because in medical school, they have classes on bonding and rapport that teach you to listen to your patient and…

Clint

That’s cool.

Al

Oh, yeah

Clint

I like this.

Al

There’s there’s a whole little push towards, well, we could increase patient satisfaction. If you the doctor would listen more. But doctors really don’t want to do that. They’re like, I’m the smartest guy in the room. I went to school longer than everybody else. And there’s a hierarchy in that hierarchy.

Clint

So are you saying most doctors are what personality?

Al

They are D’s and C’s with some S’s mixed in? Yeah, there’s a few of the cardiologists.

John

You’re too busy partying if you’re in I to make it through med school.

Clint

We’re talking about frat bros if it’s I’s, talking about med school grad.

Al

Now there’s some I’s, but I think they shift, they’re compassionate people with, you know, an enough savvy to get through the book work. And they don’t have to be D’s right. So it’d be an I that could reach across and you know, digest some information, sit down, take that test and then go in and regurgitate it.

Clint

You’re kind of describing yourself to be honest with you.

John

For sure. Absolutely.

Al

I mean, I, you know, I’m, you know, I got through that.

Al

But there’s a there’s, a point where that’s the minority, I guess, I guess where I’m going with that. Most people are either analytical or they’re driven. Like, this is my goal, you know, the D, and this is what I want. And then some very compassionate S’s. But here’s what you see. In the realm of being a physician, certain categories of physicians, neurosurgeons versus private colleges versus dermatologist versus family medicine, or a psychologist.

Clint

Yeah. Okay. Different.

Al

Yeah. So they all kind of fit a certain pattern. And when you start dealing with individual specialties, you’ll see a lot of personalities that, you know, are very similar. Sure. And there’s,

Nannette

And it can become very convoluted because I have a neurosurgeon, that is a C/S, is a C in clinic and in surgery, but he’s an S with his patients. And with his rep, me, I’ve been just be very careful, because

Clint

So two hours or three hours out of the day that we’re truly are work self versus our natural self. Yeah, you’re talking about in the in a surgery type atmosphere, you gotta be, you gotta be one person, which what you’re talking about is a C where it’s fact-driven, analytical, I’ve done the research, this is what happens. But outside of that room, I’m a lover. I’m a, you know, I like people, I care what they think. And and that’ll come out of it. What you’re talking about is, is where people slide, you know, yeah.

Nannette

Yeah, so identification of their personality is huge. Because you can, you don’t have a ton of time with them. And you better make sure you’re doing the right thing.

John

And one of the one of the big things about being an I, right, and you’ll see this in all the reading is a big need to be liked. And Al does one of the best jobs I’ve ever seen about distancing himself from that, like, you know, I mean, I’ve seen him have incredibly hard conversations with partners and people stuff like that. So he does a fantastic job. If I can,, if I can brag on you a little bit of a story about about not letting that need to be liked interfere with a business relationship, or elongating a sales cycle or giving, you know, free advice or things like that.

Al

But I can tell you that growing up and trying to be an adult that needs to be like still haunts me? Oh, for sure. I mean, because it’s a tough challenge. But the more people I’ve been exposed to, and the more I’m able to slide up to being a D and making some decisions and running a business and having to make some tough choices. I always the way I justify that is you did it to yourself. I just had a process I had to follow, right, you did this. So therefore I have to do that. And I have to remind myself of that. Sure. Because, you know, it gets tough.

Clint

Yeah, I can tell you a quick story that that Mr. Al Daniels here told made up a while back, that was true telling of who he is as a person. And open book here, I’m going to say it…

Al

Were my clothes on?

Al

Thank you. Go ahead. So you can talk about that one.

Clint

So, so uh, so Al gave me a little point at one time, it’s like, man, if you got four or five people that they just want to go to a strip club, right? They want to party, they want to go to a strip club. In here, yeah, we’re going.

Al

But But I know where you’re going. Go ahead.

Clint

But I’ve got it. I’ve got to entertain those clients, as we all do. All personalities, all sales people. It’s not comfortable for three or four of us at you know, in different ways. It’s comfortable. Sometimes it’s not. We’ve got to entertain these clients. In this situation, he said something that that blew my mind as an I and where he slid to a D was like, I’m going to be a part of this party. I’m going to get you there. I’m going to have fun with this for a minute. And then I’m going to slide a couple hundred bucks in this guy’s shirt pocket and look at that gal and say, Look, here’s where the money is. I’m out. I’ve got better things to do. See you later. You guys have fun. That’s not typically I. I would want to stay there and do all that party and to be the center of attention. Maybe that’s a bad example. I don’t know. But it always resonated with I think it’s a really great idea. So the point of it is…

Nannette

And very true about Doc.

Clint

Yeah. So that’s a point where a high I that wants to be the center of attention and be always involved in the party, take a step back, remain professionalism, slide a little bit towards a D in that case and just say, Look, I’m part of the party. You guys are still going to have fun. But I’m checking out. Call me in the morning. Let’s talk business. That’s a pretty cool revelation that that was something to me to say, Wow, you can be this guy. But you can also have some tact and you can have some some rules and regulations in your own mind but still be that guy that was pretty revolutionary for me.

Nannette

Just pulling out the best in you and someone else.

John

I’m gonna, I’m going to argue one point real quick in the site. And this idea that you have got to entertain clients, you know, and you’ve got to do this kind of stuff. Because that’s not that’s not true across the board. Right? True. That’s very relevant and y’all’s world.

Clint

I probably do less than anybody at this panel. To be honest with you. You think you do less than I do I do less than anybody.

John

I 100% disagree.

Clint

A couple thousand dollars a year.

John

Less. Like…

Clint

Okay,

John

Zero, same page. Zero, like I’ll I’ll have a cup of coffee and we’ll have a conversation but…

Clint

Doc did that for lunch today?

Al

Boring.

John

It is boring, right?

John

Because here’s the deal.

Al

Get on a plane to Vegas.

John

I’m a C, right? I don’t. They’re like I love I hold on, hold on. I love the people that I love. Right? I love all you guys. We obviously have good relationships, but the average prospect, I want to fix your problem and I want to move on. Right, which is why I do kind of what I do. And it’s a struggle for me, right? Because we’re talking about a moment ago that D’s struggle in a very long selling cycle because you got to maintain relationships. I struggle with that as well. Because the average person I could give a shit less about. Yeah, right. If I can fix your problem, let’s have that conversation.

Clint

And there’s no emotion.

John

Exactly right. Like, I have a daughter, and she’s amazing. And sometimes she gets emotional. She gets emotional about stuff. And I am not nurturing in that moment, I have to force myself to go find like, like my nurturing side of myself, because I’m like, I told you not to do that. Of course it broke. Yeah. Why are you crying? You know…

Al

Let me say, you’re a great dad, man. I’ve seen..

Al

You’re painting the wrong picture. Right.

Nannette

You are amazing.

John

Right. But here’s the deal. It’s muscle. It’s It’s It’s a muscle. Right? And the more that I repetition, right, and the more repetition, the easier it is, the easier it is, you know, that goes with him. I have days where I’m not the cool dad, like, let’s be honest about it. And you know, I fly off the handle and normally Wow. But it’s I try to not do those things. Right. So I have to I have to figure out how stressed Am I right? Because it’s all relevant to my stress at the time.

Clint

That’s, that’s a good point.

Al

I just hope my kids are listening. I’m not the only asshole.

John

You’re kids aren’t listening to this!

Al

They’re in college man, the real party. And he’s like you…

John

And your daughter’s a D.

Clint

You didn’t raise them well enough to listen to this.

John

Yeah, your daughter’s a D. She’s not listening to this.

Al

And she’s like, Dad, what? Village idiot on the show.

Clint

I want to drag you guys back in for a minute, because we’re trying to get through DISC. And we got a few minutes left here. We gotta cover essence. Yeah, I want to get through, we’ve covered what a D is dominant personality, kind of brash, kind of gut driven. Not so much people oriented. It does play a factor. Especially in my world, I do care about people, but I care more about the tasks than people. And I definitely cares about also task driven stuff, but more geared towards the people side.

John

It’s way more about people than it is about tasks.

Clint

It is, but it still falls on that spectrum. A little bit.

John

I think that that is just…

Clint

Because it benefits.

John

Well, so once again, this goes back to the work that Al has done on himself, right? He’s been in business for, hold on. Like, like, because we know a lot of I’s.

Clint

Yeah, right. No, I know, a lot of I’s that are true corner I’s and…

John

Most of those I’s are not task driven whatsoever.

Clint

Well, what I want to pictures is that, let’s let’s talk in a clock mentality here. We started at two or three o’clock with a with a D. Yeah. And we’re moving down to four or five o’clock with an I. And now we’re going to jump over on the other side of the spectrum with an S, which is Nannette here. And she is all people driven. Right? You do. You do care about a little bit of facts. But you’re you. You chuckle but uh, but you care about people and how they feel about what the job is going to end up doing. What lives is going to save? What impact to the community does it have? That is a pretty clear cut way to describe it an S. Do you have anything to say on that?

Nannette

I think Dr. Daniel, does he, what were you wanting to say, nothing?

Al

Well, yeah, I do want to say something. We all go to the grocery store, right? It’s a process, there’s only a couple of variants when you get your card you walk in. So a D goes to the grocery store, still follows the process. An I goes to the grocery store, an S, a C, you decide what size baskets you need, you walk through the process. So to think that just because you’re an I, you can’t go through a process of buying food and…

John

Once again, right. It’s about it’s about comfort zones, and it’s about identifying it’s about identifying that because, let me ask you this question. When you go to the store, do you have a list?

Clint

No

Al

Sometimes

John

Always.

Clint

Never.

John

Every freaking time

Al

Okay, but I still eat, I still have, it doesn’t make it wrong, it makes it different…

John

Correct

Al

And I forget some things and I maybe make two trips and I’m a little pissed off on the third trip.

John

Noone’s saying it’s wrong, we’re just saying that like it’s it’s relevant to your personality types.

Al

But you can still go to the grocery store, still eat.

Clint

Still be successful, right?

John

Of course.

John

Yeah. And we’re not we’re not making it out to be the that I’s are on this island and can’t be successful.

Clint

Look, once again, there’s no wrong personality here.

Nannette

If we’re going to use the analogy of the grocery store, the D is going where’s the mustard? Immediately? I need it, pay for it, out.

Clint

Yeah, and I don’t give a shit about brand. I don’t care about price. I need mustard.

John

I love this analogy.

Clint

It is good.

Nannette

And then then the I goes to the grocery store and he sees everybody and he’s like, “how you doing?”

John

Yeah, what kind of mustard you buy?

Clint

What’s, what’s the most popular mustard in the room? Because that’s what I’m buying.

John

Let me tell you a story about mustard? Once when I was a bellman…

Al

No, no, I have the best. So so when you get the cart that wobbles, too tough to handle. What do you do? What do you do when you…

Clint

I flip it upside down so nobody else..

Al

I knew you’d, I knew you’d throw it on the ground. You tip it over, Right?

Clint

There’s a fourth wheel that’s got a flat spot because they drag it across the parking lot. You flip it upside down so nobody else uses it.

Al

And when I do I get just pissed. I’m just furious, I’m mad. Cuz I’ll push it too far, right?

Al

I spent too much time with the damn cart. Now I’m stuck. Do I take it back? Do I just leave it there, which sort of that goes against my grain to just leave it in the aisle. And I just, I march it back. But a lot of times I’ll just go drag it so that it’s known that everybody, where’s management? This thing sucks.

John

Center of attention.

Nannette

And I’m going to fix it. And Clint, I mean, I’m sorry. I’m sorry.

John

My name is John

Nannette

John

Nannette

I’m fixing it.

Al

You’re gonna like get a wrench and change the wheel?

Nannette

I’m gonna go, Excuse me, I’m gonna ask people, figure out how to make everything because I don’t want someone else to have to have that jenky little… What would you like to do with it? John?

John

I test it before I walk away, swear to god. I’ll swerve it diagonally, I’m gonna move it around a couple axis’s.

John

And then I’m gonna grab the wipe and clean the handle.

Clint

Meanwhile, half of Walmart sitting in a line outside of the parking lot waiting on John to get his freakin cart.

John

That ain’t my problem.

Nannette

That’s just a little analogy, though.

Nannette

Yeah, pretty good. Came out of nowhere. So, S’s right? So to get back on task, I’m going to kind of continue the thread, right? One of the things that they’re known for is avoiding conflict. Right? I mean, it’s tried and true. It talks about all the time. And it is really hard to get Nan to, or Nannette, excuse me, to really step up and stand her ground. Right? You know, there’s a couple of topics where she’ll do it, and you’ll hear about them on here as we continue these things on. But she doesn’t go out of her way to cause conflict. Whereas Clint, man, he just runs straight at it with his hair on fire.

Clint

I don’t like love. So hate is great for me.

John

So as as an S in a sales person role, or how do you? I mean, I know the answer comes down to process and practice. But how hard is it for you to like stand your ground and push back and not discount and, you know, not let someone run you over with their process and make sure that your process runs?

Nannette

Well, literally, it’s just practice, you just go, oh, that didn’t work well, when something doesn’t work well. And so you learn and what I, going into this, I would really like to help an S out there not have to go through the process that I’ve had to go through. So I think it literally is just going, you know, that really doesn’t work well, when you have to stand up for yourself. You can love people, but you still have to stand up for yourself. Yeah…

Clint

That’s, that’s, that’s very interesting. Because as a D, I’m sitting here thinking, I don’t give a shit if you listen to this. And your first thought is, I want to help somebody. Very telling. Yeah, you know, I’m telling my story, and I don’t give a shit. I’m just telling my story. Nannette is over here saying I want to be here to help millions of people if I can, 12 people if I can, one person would be great.

Nannette

The only reason I’m sitting with, no, I love these guys. Truely, it’s really important to help people. But ultimately, I think that’s what we even Clint, our little D, or I think, our big D! Big D.

Al

Nan is all about hearts and minds.

John

So, so then wrap this up as the C, right.

John

You know, we struggle with finding rapport, right? Having rapport, having having emotional conversations, right. And we know that that’s what triggers sales. And then the other thing is that I’m so fact-driven, that for a long time, I didn’t, I didn’t really understand the idea that prospects buy for whatever reasons they see value in, like, if I thought it was better, you’re an idiot. And I would judge you if you wouldn’t make the like, if I if you’re going to spend 99 cents with me and I can make you $1 Yeah, and you don’t want to do that, bro. What are you doing? I get mad.

Clint

Sometimes, with a high C, if you’re selling to a Nannette that’s a high S, they ,they’re buying from you because they like you. Right? And you’re trying to sell to a person that likes you already.

John

And that makes me uncomfortable, right? Honestly.

Clint

Sure. So you’re trying to kill them. You’re trying to kill them with facts, but they don’t care.

John

They don’t care. They just won’t help me out.

Clint

John, I like you, bro. I love you. Stop selling me. I got it we’re in. But you can’t let that go. Because the facts aren’t there.

John

Let me show you how smart I am by giving you all these facts.

Clint

So so great example of why you need to identify across the table from who you’re selling to. Because sometimes it’s already sold. Sometimes. Yeah, and now you’re messing it up.

John

I have oversold and lost deals so many times. It’s ridiculous.

Clint

There’s no better way to lose the deal than oversell? Absolutely. And it happens to all personalities.

Nannette

Absolutely.

John

And I think that’s a great spot to kind of wrap this thing up, you know. This was, is the first episode so if you got any value out of this, go share it with someone else, right.

Al

And if you didn’t, still share.

Clint

Share it.

Al

Yeah. One of your buddies needs this help. Maybe you don’t, but somebody you know.

John

The thing is, Al made the statement whenever we were planning this is that like, you’re going to find yourself in one of us, right. So you might hate me but love Al. Right? That makes sense. Right?

Clint

It does.

Al

Makes sense to me.

Clint

Reverse that statement.

John

Find yourself in one of us, right? We’ve been down the road, we’re still on the road all day every day. If you get any value in this go share it with someone else. Go follow us on social media. Everything is at Sales Throwdown. And if you’re listening to us, you know, download all the other episodes. If you’re watching us on YouTube, subscribe and we’ll be back soon.