Episode 3: DISC Personality Type – Influencer

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John

Alright, welcome to Episode Three, we take a deep dive into Al, who is our I, which stands for Influencer. We talk a lot about his history, how he got to where he is now. And the key points that I want you to take away is how to deal with an I, no matter where you are on the spectrum. The things that are important to them. Also, listen to how Al really can go off on a tangent because that is very stereotypical of when you’re selling to an I. And you have to be able to enable that as well as shut that off and listen to some of his industry knowledge because he works in one of the hardest industries to sell in and to be successful in, and he does a really good job of it. appreciate all the feedback from the earlier episodes, follow us on social media and subscribe, and hope you get a lot from the show.

Announcer

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the main event. In the D corner we have Clint The Cleaver Bigelow. In the I corner, we have Al The Gambler Daniel. In the S corner, we have Nan The Promoter Fallman, and in the C corner, we have John Small Mountin Hill.

Let’s get ready to throwdown.

John

Awesome. Alright, Episode 00003. Hey again. There we go. Like to be here for a while. That’s right.

We are taking the deep dive into AI which stands for influencer or, in my world, it means impulsive.

Al

The backup and do the whole DISC thing just so that people are joining this now. kind of catch it.

John

Yeah, if you didn’t listen to episode one or two, right? We are here talking about DISC, which is a personality assessment that is very popular in sales. And it’s popular because everybody has strengths. Everybody has weaknesses. makes up a four corners D, I, S, and C. We make up those four corners. Episode Two, if you haven’t listened to it yet. Go back and listen to it, we spend the entire time talking about D, we talked about Clint, who he is and why he’s here. And today we’re doing the same thing but we’re gonna talk about Al, his history, why he’s here. And all things I. Weaknesses, strengths, and everything in between.

Al

Probably more weakness than strengths.

John

Yeah, there we go.

Clint

I don’t know if we brought enough booze for this.

Al

You’ll be okay.

John

All right, Al. So what do you do now?

Al

I own a medical distributorship and couple clinics. Herd a bunch of cats, which are called doctors, they’re not cool cats. They’re crazy cats.

John

All right. How long have you been doing that?

Al

20 something years. Okay.

John

And what’d you do before that?

Al

I was a Bellman.

John

Oh, God, we’re missing something in there.

Nannette

Every hour of our lives.

Al

Go to ground zero, baby. Ground Zero right there, hauling bags. Working for tips.

Nannette

I promise you. That will not be the last time you hear that statement.

Al

I know everything I know, predicated on the eight and a half years I sold for tips, eight and a half years, guys.

Clint

Well, that explains a lot about your personality to, that you could do that. Because not everybody can do that.

John

Oh, Clint would just set the hotel on fire.

Clint

Two dollars? Bro.

Al

The best thing I ever saw was a guy throw a quarter over somebody’s car. He got tipped the quarter. Now this is back in the 80s. But still, it was a buck. And so guy gets a quarter. He stand in the drive, throws it over the dude’s car. The guy stops and he stands their arms cross. And I’m like ballsy is like, Top Gun, ballsiest move I ever seen.

Clint

You can be my wingman any time.

Al

Exactly. I was like, dude, you were on the front drive, man. That’s great. That’s awesome.

John

So one of the big things about being an I are storytellers. In case you did not expect that.

Al

Funny, I just fell right into that.

John

So so let’s focus on the thing that I think is more interesting, right, because you talk about the clinics, but let’s talk about the main distributorship. Right selling medical devices, hardware, all that stuff.

Clint

Can I back up a little bit? Because you can’t go from a Bellman into medical?

Al

Yes, you can. If you’re good and…

Nannette

There’s something between.

John

I think he’s dodging on purpose. There’s a reason why Clint and Nan call him doc.

Clint

Yeah, I think he should dive into that a little bit because it gives some background and some feedback into why you’re doing what you do now.

Nannette

And our I’s aren’t genuinely humble. So let’s be real here. We love this. Go ahead.

Al

So what’s the question?

Al

How did you get from being a Bellman to where you are today?

Nannette

Owning a broke ass medical distributorship.

Nannette

Tell your story.

Al

Where to start? You know, I’m basically a junior college graduate. Found my way into some upper studies. Ended up eventually graduating as a chiropractor. Came out into the world of chiropractic care in 1995. Worked as a slave to a couple of guys for about four years. Man Yeah, you’re dead broke when you get out of school, man. I mean, you don’t have a pot to piss and you can’t wait to work as a matter of fact, when I got out of school, the state had a moratorium on issuing licenses only because they just didn’t have a what they call to you know, four person panel to sign off on this. So I went back to hauling bags for about a month.

Clint

I didn’t know that.

Al

And they were like, Oh my god, you know, great to have you back. Wasn’t with the same company, it was with some guys that switched over.

John

I didn’t either.

Clint

But you had a formal education at this point.

Al

I did. Man, I had postgraduate education.

John

You were you irritated by this process about having to haul bags while you know, you were a chiropractor in everything but title?

Al

You know, I could have worked for $10 an hour, shooting x rays and working under the tutelage of somebody, but I played softball with these guys. And it continued the relationship. So they were like, hey, come help us straighten some things out at the you know, the hotel chain, and it was a big hotel.

Clint

So did you miss the camaraderie of of what you had? was it? Was that what you were missing as a Bellman?

Al

Missing? I’m sorry.

Clint

So after you got out of school, yeah, right, you were missing some action?

Al

Money. And I needed cash. Okay, and that was immediate cash. I didn’t have to wait for anything I show up. I get paid man. That’s the beauty of that position. And I knew it well. So it was an easy fix to make, you know, three grand a month, right? Which is, you know, I wouldn’t gonna make that working as you know, like an unlicensed associate. So I jumped into that. The license came through, you know, because this is old snail mail right. This is an immediate you know, sit on the computer and get your your credentialing. It came in the mail. I’m like, holy crap, and I’m licensed I’m Game on. Immediately went back to the hotel and said, Hey, guys having to give up the position, you know, there. Oh, shit, you know, didn’t think was going to be this quick. I said, See ya. And already had a job lined up. So started working for a guy and slave wages still, but wait a second, let me back up. I actually made $36,000 was my starting salary. I was like, ghetto rich man. I mean, I made probably 30 something grand as a tipped in guy but you know, I’m working all kinds of..

John

Salary makes it different?

Al

Oh, yeah. I know. It’s guaranteed

Clint

What year are we talking about?

Al

Clint

Okay.

Al

Yeah. So, were you even born then?

Clint

Yeah, come on man.

Clint

But damn good salary. And 95?

Al

Well, I had spent four years making no money or parking cars, doing little odd jobs, throwing newspapers, I’m, you know, always about, you know, finding a buck.

Clint

And so the daily hustle. Definitely a driver, you like that?

Al

Well, I come from that, eight and a half years, it’s a daily hustle. If you show up at a hotel, and you’re hauling bags, and that’s what you do. Welcome to the hotel, boom, boom, boom, pull them out of the trunk, welcome in or take them from the bell stand and walk them up to the room. It’s just that was the game.

John

How long were you… So you come on as an associate, right, they train you, which is I’m sure very helpful. Sales is one of the few industries where you don’t actually get shown very much in a lot of instances. And then you eventually have some clinics under you.

Al

And well, when you get out of school, you have what we call the didactic, right, you’ve got the cortical knowledge, you’ve pushed through the books, you’ve set your boards, you know, you you know, you’ve paid your dues in that sense. But you’ve really not seen the business end of that equation, which is how do you run a practice? How do you make payroll, rules, regulations, don’t get sued, stay insured, all of those concepts are kind of foreign to you. And what what does that look like cost wise?

John

But how? Okay, so as the I, right, a lot of this business stuff, you know, the backside of things is not the thing that you naturally run to? So how do you balance that as well as also having to provide front end care? And in a minute, we’re going to talk about how you left that world, but I’m kind of curious about this.

Al

Well, as an I, what you do is you make strategic alliances, right? And we’re real good at abdicating power to people, in a certain sense. In that, you know, get a good attorney, get a good accountant, get a good office manager, I have the first person I ever hired 24 years later, right? Because people tend to generally like I’s, and we can pitch fits, and we can have our bad moments. But most of the time, we’re willing to kiss and make up. You know, if I step on your toes, and I know about it and I’m going to come with an apology that makes sense.

It’s hard to stay mad at an I. And I’m sure everybody, I think in your friend circle, you’ll find that you haven’t you always have a high I, otherwise you’re not having fun. There’s no doubt. I mean, they they are the ones they’re the drivers of those situations, you go you go out to a bar, you go out, let’s just say camping, they’re always going to find the fun side of any situation.

Nannette

They usually created initially.

Clint

Yeah, of course. Yeah, that’s a good point.

Al

Well, and part of that is being a dreamer, being an idea person. creative. Well, and I don’t know how creative I am. But whenever people are starting to brainstorm stuff, you’re like, well, how would you fire that up? Right, great idea. How do you put the glitz? The glamour, the pizzazz into that? Or Oh, wouldn’t it be cool to do this or add adding to the story that somebody brings to you, and a case in point. So I got to a point where guys are starting to get married, right? It’s like the bachelor party thing. Being from the hotel industry, we’re like, well, let’s get the bus and let’s get the keg of beer. And so, I, no lie. So I’d be on the front right there by the door. People were partying in the back, we’d pull up to a strip club, and I’m like, pop the door, I’d walk to the front door, I go, I got 40 guys on a bus. We’ll drink two drinks. We want all the women up front, in our face. We’re not staying very long. But here’s my commitment. They’re like, bring it no cover charge. They’re moving chairs out of the way. Right? That simple little introduction and and then at the end of the night guys are like oh my god, that was amazing. I didn’t have to draw this before Uber and all that kind of stuff. So and I got I got a little excited.

John

Of course you did.

Clint

When I think about an I and going back to like your Bellman days and your stories that you’re telling I think of a concierge, every concierge I know of is very much what you’re describing.

Al

We were all trying to have sex with the concierge.

They were more of a female staff. Except for the big guy. This is not anymore. No, as I say, it’s a male kind of industry originally, like in Europe, the concierge was usually a man. But when it came over here, it was usually pretty girls that were setting you up with the reservation Make sense? So we did have a concierge staff. In addition to bellman, we were the grunts basically we weren’t, you know…

Clint

What a different outlook on sales, talking about what you’re talking about? Because that’s a, that’s a hustle, right? You’re figuring people’s personalities, what they like, what they don’t like.

John

Are you even aware of that though?

Clint

I don’t know that you’re aware, but I think it comes naturally because he’s an I.

Al

Well, you perceive a need.

Okay? So and I often tell people, and this is one line I use over and over again. When somebody comes to your business, or you’re introducing somebody to what you do, they don’t they may know a little bit or they may know nothing. It’s like if you come to my clinic, you don’t know where the restroom is, I need to be able to tell you. If you walk into a hotel, you don’t know where the front desk is. Maybe it’s your first time to stay or maybe you’re a seasoned traveler that’s stayed with us before. Hopefully I would recognize it. It’s like going to your favorite bar. They know what you’re going to drink. If not, you really need to perceive a need. When somebody sits there and they have a blank look on their face. Ask a question. Yeah, you know.

Clint

That brings me to a really good question, because I’d like to ask, to stay on, kind of stay on task, because that’s tough.

Gonna be tougher today.

John

Take a shot every time Al tells a story.

Clint

Yeah, one of the things I want to talk about is…

Al

You’ll get drunk really quick.

Clint

As an I. I know you slide to a D a lot in business. I see that because I know you. But naturally in a social setting, I think you’re an I. And what what drives you? Is it people pleasing? Is it the people orientation? Is it money? Is it, what’s your drivers?

John

Is it the relationships?

Al

You know, I think the drive that I have is clearly not money. Money comes along the way okay. I look at delivering service. Often and this didn’t come from me, it came in a collective drinking session with a bunch of guys other than you, give till it hurts and then give a little bit more. But I I expect certain things from the people that I give to, right. I expect you to be a good friend. Okay. All right. I don’t expect you to fuck me. Don’t go around my back, never lie to me. Okay? Or make it so minor that I would understand why you would? Because I give everybody 100 points and you get to lose em. I don’t make you earn anything.

But once you lose…

Clint

That’s, that’s some deep shit there..

John

That’s not how Clint works.

Clint

You start at a zero. Okay, negative two.

Al

Okay, but when you say they’re dead to me, I’ve got that too. Lost all your tokens. You’re dead.

Clint

But you had to do some, yeah, no, that makes sense.

Al

I don’t want to kill you after the fact. And I’ll still stand in a room with you. But we’ll know each other. And you’ll know why you don’t need to talk to me about certain things. And you need to be very pleasant. Sure. Or I’ll call Clint.

John

Okay, so hold on, hold on. So let’s get through the history and like, let’s stay on task.

Nannette

I would like to, I want to make a comment that on that. He does mention the whole throwing bags.

Okay, so he reference, says that all the time. But I think it’s amazing how that was such an impact. Creating you, who you are.

Clint

It definitely shaped you.

Nannette

And I hear that a lot in business. I hear you know, there’s the guy that he threw newspapers and that.

Clint

We talked about it with me being a D. I started out as a helper, right. So like, it’s funny, because a lot of successful people, they didn’t just come into success, they had to work for it at some point. And they developed themselves through experiences, and your experience to start off to develop you into who you are now started there. Absolutely. So to get back to task is that’s where we started. Yeah. So.

John

So after you’re an associate, you go out on your own, right, you’re, you’re pretty successful there, you have a couple of clinics, right? Going on…

Al

You know, is one of the craziest moments, I was working for a guy that just was never around the clinic, and I was making him a lot of money. And things were going well, I basically, the greatest asset, I think, is for people to underestimate your capabilities, that you’re doing a great job, but you would never leave, right, or that you don’t have the financing to leave. You know, the money is the easy part. If you got a great idea, you just got to pitch it to enough people and sell somebody on backing you with the funding. I happen to come from a family that’s a lot like the mafia.

They’ve got some cash, right. I have a rich side and poor side. I came from probably the lesser side of those two equations, but I was able to pick up the phone and procure money. Now, my relative said, you know, I’m not a bank, which means it’s going to cost. And the craziest part was, so I spring out on my own get into a lawsuit over the whole thing. Right? So my first big money lawsuit, consult with an attorney for the first time who says, “All right, let’s do the ROI on this venture that you’re going out that’s going to piss this other guy off.” Because the staff walked out with me. I had a non-compete, I mean, I did not have a non-compete. So I the original arrangement was I’ll work for you a year, we’ll either partner up, because this was on the backside of the four year tenure, working for people. That didn’t happen. So I challenged the equation. I was told that Yeah, I wasn’t gonna be taken on as a partner. So sprouted wings and left that cost me 100 K.

John

Were you always kind of entrepreneurial? Yeah. Or is it? Like, is that part of the I toolkit?

Al

Yeah, I think so. As a kid I grew up in a fox in Jake’s neighborhood My dad was an electrician all the extra we had was because of overtime and things like that. And I you know, I mowed yards, I saw needs in my neighborhood. I you know, back before, it was weird for a dude to babysit kids. You know, I, my cousins live there. So I babysat them, then I got known as the guy that you would call if you had unruly kids that nobody wanted to look after. Right? So now I got along with those guys. And so I got $3 an hour instead of a buck an hour, right? So it’s already up the pay scale as a kid around the neighborhood because I just followed through and somehow accomplished everything, as lame brain as I kind of probably was at the time.

John

So so naturally entrepreneurial. Right? So I think somehow…

Clint

Yeah, but it is because it isn’t able for you. Are you able to chase dreams? I mean, comfortably? Because you seem like that guy.

Al

Oh, absolutely.

Clint

So when we talked about even what we’re doing right now, you know, it was a dream, a pipe dream for us. us three, the other three people here, me, John, and Nan, probably wouldn’t have followed through without your kind of drive and your push.

Nannette

And I was gonna say he does not have fear. And I think I don’t know if that’s…

Al

Wait a second. I had fear because fear is good, right? Fear of death fear. I don’t want it. I don’t have fear of failure, though. I don’t, I’m not afraid of making a mistake. I’m not afraid of somebody going, you’re wrong. And I’m like, you’re absolutely right. If that only happens occasionally. Thank…

Nannette

Say the recreate comment that you always say, that you kind of made mention of it a few minutes ago that we, I can recreate something.

Al

Oh, if you hadn’t, like, lost it all and burnt your fucking house down. You haven’t really lived. One day you look at your bank account, you go, shit, I got no money, right? I’m going bankrupt. Right? And you’re like, which I haven’t, thank goodness. But if you’ve never looked and felt the stress of Holy shit, this isn’t working, and said, What but you know, what you start doing then is working the next plan, which is the out and then the back in? Right? How do I move a transition into another economic situation? And if you’re sweating that, don’t get in business for yourself, because I can challenge just about everybody. Unless you’re born with that silver spoon where there’s a lot of family money. Everybody who has made any money has lost a ton of it. You know?

John

Or you’ve had to gamble in some tight spots?

Al

Well, I say you throw 100 things against the wall, you hope two stick and you hope one makes a lot of money. And the other one doesn’t cost you a lot of money because people forget…

Clint

Yeah, I would. I would agree that you do that. I don’t do that. I don’t think John does that.

Al

But John gambles. So he understands the risk, but his risk is in a box.

Clint

Calculated risk.

John

My Risk is very informed.

Al

I try to stay informed. So I don’t think that I don’t spend a lot of time on the web, looking at what other successful people are doing. And then adopting bits and pieces of what they do that fit my personality. So you do Kung Fu. And one of the things that often, I mean, you learn a lot of stuff, right? When you do martial arts, and you’ve been in combat, there’s a lot of techniques, you use the ones that best fit you. You just fit your style, your personality, your body size, what you’re capable of.

John

So let’s talk about you leaving the clinic space and diving into the medical device sales, arguably the hardest thing to sell. And it was the hardest, hardest thing I’ve ever sold.

Clint

Because you worked for Doc.

John

Yeah, we I mentioned that on last episode. I worked for Al for about 18 months.

Clint

And Nan currently works for Doc.

John

Yes. They work together.

Al

Or with me, I mean, look at the people that, particularly on the sales side, as being my partners, because they’re they’re commission oriented. So it’s a partnership, right? I mean…

Clint

That’s fantastic of you to say that.

John

Absolutely. Al took a big shot on me, for sure. Because I was working at a bank of selling investments and never been in the b2b space, and Al and I knew each other from Kung Fu. And so one day, he was like, Hey, I got a spot you want to talk about?

Al

That’s right, bitches, bring it. There’s some hard hitting mofos sitting behind this desk. Shout out to everybody that’s in the martial arts. So you know, the attack world of like special ops and things like that.

John

So So let’s talk a little bit about how you transition from chiropractic clinic to this and the failure rates and why it’s so hard and because it’s really hard.

Al

The best thing ever said to me, two things, right? Two things. And this, this made me. i got i think i got an erection, right. My banker says to me one day, I didn’t realize chiropractors made this much money. I’m like, oh, motherfucker, man. I’m like, Huh, endzone dance. I’m like, Whoa, I mean, hey, I’m a kid talking to a banker, right. And then I exited the clinic strategy, because some dynamics in healthcare had changed. And it was basically because I was losing my ass. But other people in my industry complimented me on getting out of the game before I completely cratered, right? Well, so they had lost big clinics and things like that, because, you know, there’s the industry didn’t support it. And it was not me being prolific. It was me running for the hills, because I couldn’t make any money. Right? So let people tell you what their perception is. Don’t automatically sink that into your head, just swim. Just survive. Just get down the road. Yeah.

Clint

Are you? So? So can we move forward a little bit? I’m looking at you, John, because I know you kind of have an agenda in your head. Have we covered fully what where Doc is now? Do you feel that you have, Doc?

Al

Oh yeah, absolutely. Yeah, now sell dead body parts, nuts, bolts and screws. You know, I gotta, you know, and and I have a couple, of you know, there’s more than one division to what we do.

Clint

And I got a sneak peek into your world just to touch. And that really opened my eyes to, it’s completely different. We’re both in sales. We’re both in the day to day grind. Your business and mine are completely different. But we both have to follow processes, we both have to follow certain rules of the game. And I was pretty, pretty shocked about what you guys go through you and Nan, especially, on that side. But can we can we talk about when we talk about dealing with an I? And we talked about motivators, and these big buzzwords, how would you describe yourself as an I? Besides the clinks of the ice cubes? Like timing?

Al

I’m not sure I fully understood.

Clint

So if you had to describe yourself in some big words, you know, three or four big words. What would those be?

John

Or buzzwords, right. Yeah.

Al

That’s a, you know, not just empty air there.

That’s a hard one because I let other people tell me who I am a lot. Okay. Yeah, I know. I don’t walk around with a definition. I mean, really, really don’t.

Nannette

You do Clint?

Clint

Correct.

Nannette

He’s waiting.

Al

Well, that’s, that’s like you’re an ass. I’m like, Okay, thank you for telling me that. You’re amazing. Thank you for telling me that. Why do you ask, you know? So you tell me what you think. Okay, we’ll figure it out.

Clint

So, so I in DISC stands for influencer, right?

Al

Okay. Please elaborate.

Clint

How do you feel, in your world, how do you feel that you’re an influencer, your social settings, in your in your day to day?

Al

I think I want the other person that I’m speaking to to succeed. I want all my friends to be wealthy, happy, great people. Right? I want to see you guys because you’ll invite me to what you’re doing, you know, your big house or you know, a lunch or whatever? Well, we’ll have some good times together. But what I don’t like is people who live in a bucket of misery, right? Go jump off a bridge, and I got no time for that. Life is tough. And you gotta you gotta find the silver lining. But some people out there just need to go kill themselves right?

Nannette

gasp No!

John

Side note, we’re not actually advocating anyone to go kill themselves.

Al

No, seriously, if you’re thinking that then you got a problem. I don’t mean to speak directly to the audience. But really, Come on, guys, stop listening, if that’s gonna butt hurt you, you’re gonna jump off a bridge.

Clint

So I think with dealing with I’s myself, a lot. You guys say a lot of things that I have to read between the lines on what you actually mean, which is a to the point of what you just said is, you know, you need to find a new profession, profession. And, you know, if this isn’t successful for you, you need to find a new profession. And I gotta read a lot of content and pull a lot of text to, to your comments that you just said to pull that out of it. Well, okay. And a lot of I’s are like that.

Nannette

Very extreme statement.

Al

But to speak to that, you know, a lot of I’s, Yeah. But I’ve just been able to meet some really successful people. And the big fallacy is to look at somebody and say, I could do that. I just don’t walk around and do that. I think they put a lot of time and effort into it. They make it look easy. That’s why they’re good at it. They make it look easy. That’s why they’re good at it. But you don’t see the backstory of all the hours to hone their skill set. Because when they show up at the table, you’re all hanging out or you’re at a business meeting. Like like the the movie. He’s bonafide.

John

Exactly.

Al

That’s given that hundred points that that top scale. He’s bonafide till he proves otherwise, I’m not making improve anything.

Clint

So would you say you have compassion for that grind?

Al

Oh, a lot of respect, respect.

Clint

Respect, compassion.

Nannette

So Dr. Daniel’s best friend is the coolest man. I’m telling you.

Al

Nan’s got man love for him.

Nannette

I just think he rocks. I mean, he’s just so and he loves out. And their personalities are so completely different.

Al

He’s a lot like you.

Nannette

Yeah, he’s a D.

Clint

So, awesome.

Al

I know a lot of awesome people. I you know, I, you know, I know a lot of C’s that I have immense respect for. My accountants a C, I wouldn’t expect him to be anything other. And the guy literally, I’m at the gambling tables, and they’re wanting some information from me. I got him on speed dial, I’m like, What’s going He’s like, chill, we got this. They’re just…

Clint

You don’t want an accountant that’s not a C.

You don’t want an S accountant, you don’t want a D accountant.

You definitely don’t want an I accountant, he’ll burn it at the stripclub.

Al

Here’s the great part. Here’s the great part of my accountant, though, right? You know, and he he’s Yeah, he’s amazing. I will give him a shout out later and another episode. But do you like it’s just a little chuckle whenever I call, like, what now?

What’s going on now? And…

Nannette

Don’t you get that from everybody though?

Al

And we laugh a lot on the phone, right, which I know is him coming out of his little C world to go What now? Right? And that’s the fun part of life. What now?

John

So one of the big things about being an I, right, is that they’re, they’re friendly with everybody. In a social interaction, you’re typically the center of attention, you’re telling a story.

Al

Unless I’m yelling at you.

John

But how does that translate to business? Right? Because one of the things that we know that that selling to an I, you got to give them room to talk, you gotta let them tell their stories. You can’t shut them down too quick. You can’t force them to like stay on task.

Clint

But you also have to focus em at some point.

John

Absolutely. Right. So, but that can, but that looks like sometimes, there’s this need to be liked. With most I’s.

Al

I’m usually liked. Right? Yeah. My biggest thing is not to talk over people. My biggest thing is to listen to their story and not tell them mine. Those are the biggest challenges. When you understand that you’re talking to a D, as an I, that should be your biggest asset, you understand other people, so you let them be the person that they need to be in the conversation. You pull yourself back when you need to, you step in front when you need to.

Nannette

And you’re very good at that. In the OR. He is phenomenal with just the respect level, the I think you’re really phenomenal at what you bring to the room.

Al

Well, personally, part of that too, is you got to couple your personality with showing up early, staying late, knowing your shit. And it really can’t be just a bag of of illness. Yeah, I mean, you’ve got to have some meat and potatoes and some…

Clint

Your knowledge is power in your world..

Al

Absolutely. You need to have read the material know it, but you’re not in there vomiting, you’re seeing a pretty like when something’s not working. You’re interjecting a solution. Yeah. And you…

Clint

I watched it in the OR that day that they said, Oh shit, where’s where’s Al? Can you go get him, go get him. And I was like, Oh, my God,

Nannette

And his I does not come out in the OR, so he can reign it in.

John

My first day, we’re in the OR it’s like 5am in the morning. And I don’t know, like anybody for me. I know al and I think I met you once. And he’s just like, sit over here or stand over here. Don’t touch anything. Don’t touch it. Don’t talk to anybody yet. I was like, Okay, yeah, made me feel incredibly uncomfortable.

Al

Which is me politely saying don’t fuck it up. Exactly.

You know, you touch something that you shouldn’t touch. And now we gotta strip everything down. And everybody, hold on. And there’s 16 people that are pissed at you. Yeah, you know, because you inadvertently, you know, got in the way. And remember, there is there rules to follow in there. And for those of you, you know, you go into a surgical situation where you’re doing a major spine surgery, that’s a really serious event, right? So you can, if you’re really good at something like, you know, you’ve been to war, right? You can break tension, but you want to know, everybody on the team is in for whatever happens. And that’s the way it goes surgery is I mean, you got to be there. If the patient bleeds out, they have a heart attack while they’re on the table. I mean, I can go in time and time again about how…

Clint

And you got to adapt to the situation you got overcome absolute chaos is the same.

Al

It’s the same principle there that you guys probably experienced in a lot of things.

Clint

Very much so.

Nannette

I think that the reason that we are talking about this, I think it’s really important that an I being just flamboyant and attention getter can step into not being that way.

Al

Well, you’re still that way. What it is, is you’re doing your job, your your personality gets, probably put it a lower key, because your focus is now on what’s the next step. What’s the next step, we’re in a process, and everybody has that. So when you go to do something, there is a process, you follow the rules being an I doesn’t mean you don’t follow the rules, or you skirt around them.

John

So, so let’s talk about the other side of that world, right? All the people that are trying to sell to these doctors knocking on offices and everything else like that. And they haven’t had any success yet, because it’s a very long selling cycle, which is great for an I because you’re so relationship driven. You know, it’s like doing the whole lunch thing and the happy hour thing like that’s right in your wheelhouse.

Al

It is.

John

How do you balance that with being productive?

Okay, yeah. And I thought that’s where you’re going, you probably need to live in an arena where the margins are large enough to where, you know, when you start talking about big surgeons and big volume. in Dallas Fort Worth metroplex, there may be 30, or 40, guys, maybe 50 guys, that are just big producers. And it doesn’t take very many of them before, you’ve got a great standard of living. And so you’re going to run through and get to know these guys are going to the hospital and Nan can speak to this. There’s a lot of people that know us and we talked to them, they just don’t buy from us, they like us whether they’re already tied up with somebody. So I’m waiting for the next guy to make the mistake. And I see a lot of good cats. Whenever I’m in the award, the people I work around the other vendors, and they’re a lot like us, they’re good, they show up. And if here’s the crazy part, and I guess I’ll be honest, I’ve had this happen to way. I’ve saved other vendors, because I just don’t want it, and they got families, I don’t want to see them go without. So I’m going to try to cover or help them out because they would. Now very seldom does anybody have to help me out. I think I’m that good. And that’s a little bit of my ego. So I don’t make very many mistakes. And when somebody else makes a mistake, I know they have a family, I know they have kids they want to feed, so I’m going to make sure that if there’s anything I can do to help them continue their career in the OR, because you don’t get a whole lot of mistakes, particularly when you’re dealing with live people that are on the table. I want to that’s my you know, that’s just my nature not to fuck somebody over.

Clint

That says a lot to your personal reality. I’s as as people driven, right, that says a lot to that. And, and whereas john and i as a as a as a top side of the spectrum that are not we’re task oriented, not people driven. We we would not agree with you there that we, me personally, I would just kind of be like, Man, you screwed up. You fucked up, get out, my show now. Yeah, that’s my drive versus what you’re what you’re saying right now.

Nannette

And I’ve had other I’ve had other people in the business ask me, is he really that kind? He will not throw people under the bus. He he doesn’t. And one of the big guys literally came to me was just like, Is he really like? Would he screw someone over? Now? I said no, he will not screw people over. He just doesn’t do that.

Al

But I don’t think, you know, you say what you say. But I think that everybody sitting at this table, generally, would not F somebody over. Or we wouldn’t be sitting here. I couldn’t sit here with a clean conscience.

Clint

You’re right, we’re all talking about the corners of the personality spectrum, which is DISC, you just have. The reason this all started is that we’re all in those corners naturally. That’s that’s how our Disc profile show up. So yeah, we’re also for now we’ve done a lot of training, we’ve done a lot of self awareness to change ourselves to be better. A lot of people sitting out there listening to this aren’t. So I want to I want to one of the things that we want to dig out of an I is is how do you communicate with an I? How do you order the traits? How do you identify with an I?

Al

Oh, there are I’s that drives me nuts. Right? I was just telling you guys, the other day, I was dealing with the guy from California, and he was a nice enough guy. Man, he just went off on tangents about you know, you know, from his computer side of things that that I just didn’t have time for. And anyway, everybody’s got a certain style, I think that what I’s are good at is allowing people to be themselves and giving them you know, the the latitude to be that way. It’s not that you don’t judge them. It’s just that you let them be that way, even with your judgment that you put on top of it. But if the process gets done, if in this guy did I mean I didn’t like the style, but he did what he said he was going to do got me a deep discount, followed through. So I had nothing to complain about. He showed up as he as he probably generally was. And so I have to really sort of have an appreciation for that. But I have to sometimes step away from that because it does get annoying.

Clint

Sure, I always, I always come in I’s for being able to, in a roundabout way, say go F yourself, but they do it in a manner that you’re still you still want to hang out with them. Which is a crazy thought. Because I can’t do that. John, you can’t do that. When we say go F yourself. We mean it, you’re dead to me. Because we’re not people oriented. An S would never say that anyway, so it doesn’t really hold any weight to this conversation. But an I can say no.

Nannette

I feel a little slighted here.

Clint

But that’s what I mean. But but Nan would never say that. So doesn’t you know that that’s a complete corner S.

Al

I’m calling your mom, she’s gonna wash your mouth with soap.

Clint

Let me tell you. I mean, I’ve eaten some, I’ve eaten Zest.

Nannette

No, no, really across the board, has everyone been punished with soap in the mouth?

Clint

I’ve chewed bars of soap and cried.

Al

The word stupid, right, twice.

John

Let’s talk about one of the bigger things in sales that is super important that we have all learned is going for the no. And the reason why I’m interested in this is because I think it’s really hard for an I because you’re so relationship driven. And it’s really easy to kind of hang out and hope that something is going to happen. And hold on. The other part of that is your industry specifically, there’s not as you just said, there’s not that many players. So you can’t just blatantly disqualify people. It’s not a no for forever, just to no for today.

Clint

Which is way different than talking about my personality and my industry where where I can do that. So that’s a really good question, John.

Al

Let me stop you guys. My biggest successes with these guys I deal with has been when I said this probably isn’t something you’re interested in. It’s hard for me to say that. But there’s been my biggest reward when I’m like, why would I do that? Right? And then it puts them off because they think I’m the guy that would say yes to everything. I initially never say no, but I don’t say yes.

Clint

So you said that’s really hard for you to say. What’s the fear? And why?

Al

It’s not fear. It’s just my general personality is just to go along with whatever you’re saying, Oh my god, this is great. The guys like responding well to me, I want to be liked. But what I’ll do is I’ll catch myself and I have to literally catch myself and then challenge the prospect.

Clint

And were you always that way.

Al

No, I did a lot of free consulting. I did a lot of vomiting in front of these guys. And I had some hits Don’t get me wrong. I wasn’t unsuccessful.

Nannette

I still catch him every once in a while.

Al

I just became more successful when I started following a system that says, Clint, now why would we do that? John, why would we do that? Nan, why do you think that’s a great idea? So instead of going oh my god, that’s amazing. Oh, yeah, I’d actually see what you’re talking about. Clint. Oh, amazing.

Clint

So you adapted a process a sales process at some point in your business that you didn’t have?

Al

No, I had a personality but no process.

Clint

So before the process, you are winging it.

Al

Pretty much, getting some hits. You’re not starving.

Clint

Sure, it’s not a, so that a lot of this concept is efficiency. Absolutely. So it’s not that you’re not successful. If you’ve ever made one sale, I touched on this a little bit if you made a million phone calls and you got one, it’s a successful model. So man to get to sales and have to call 2 million people because that’s your here ratio.

Al

That’s a lot of work.

Clint

So so to up your efficiency, you developed the process,

Al

I started honing in on cutting off the fat going in with the same personality being the same person, but putting a process together that eventually got to a challenge question that made them come towards me instead of me constantly chasing them.

Clint

That’s a, wow. I mean, that’s revolutionary. Can you tell me a little bit more how you develop that and why you go through that process?

Al

I went to some formal training and started following… I didn’t invent that wheel, I somebody had a process that made a lot of sense to me

Nannette

Principles never change.

Al

And I made it my own right I use those tactics that I was taught, which part of it was DISC, understanding who my audience was then going through, you know, bonding and rapport stopped me because I’m, we all come from the same mold. If I do some copywrite stuff; pain points, and I get better every day, every conversation I have makes me a little bit better than I was before. But there’s a schematic in my head that I start to follow using my personality using what I consider my charm or my talent, or what I have to offer. And I’m okay, following the process. I’m okay with no actually, that I want to be better at hearing you say no, because then I’m like…

Clint

But that didn’t always happen. That’s, that’s a new development.

Al

But I’m not new. But I’ve been doing this for a while.

Clint

But I think you reacted, you react 20 years ago differently as a Bellman versus now, that, those two no’s, react in you differently because you’re self aware and you have a process, right?

Al

And we talk about that, where you bring your prop your your personality to the process, then you bend that process in little nuances to fit your personality. So you don’t give up who you are, you just become a better individual at the arena of selling, just like you would fly fishing or you know, any material clinical processes. This is no different; pick up the phone and make the call, do the introduction, get your appointment those kind of things.

Clint

To me, you’re a very good representative of you can teach new ways to people that have been doing something maybe 10 years, five years, 25 years. If you think you can’t change, I think you’re a really good representative of that.

John

You got to be coachable.

Clint

Yeah, you can be.

Al

Oh, absolutely.

Clint

But you have to be self accepting of who you are. And somebody has to kind of…

Al

Well, to stop you there. You don’t give up yourself to learn a new idea.

John

That’s really interesting. I’ve never thought about it in that way. And I don’t I don’t I don’t disagree with you. I 100% agree with you. But I think that some people think the other way and not even realize that they’re thinking in that way. And I don’t know if that…

Clint

No, because, as I said that when we were talking about D’s a little bit, I touched on… you have to take some of your ego and put in the backseat, touch on that. And then but you don’t want to give up your natural traits, because those traits are what makes you who you are. And that’s what gets the job done. Sure. That’s, that’s, that’s what drives you every day. So don’t give that up. But you have to soak in those little things and take a backseat.

Al

So it’s like the first time Nan was in the OR praying with somebody, right? She She turned around and said, you know is that, I’m like, you had them in your wheelhouse. That’s what they needed from you. She gets called to pray with tons of people, like just yesterday, lady having a brain tumor removed. There are going to be these moments where you can really influence people’s lives by being you, sticking to your process, and building those relationships.

Clint

Talk about trust.

It is, that’s what it is, people trust you.

John

The underlying point is that there’s all these different sales methodologies, right. There’s Carnegie and, you know, John Maxwell, and like all the all the various, hundreds of them, but they work in a vacuum, right. And you can take them just straight out of that classroom and use them in probably see some success. But it’s not until you pair that with your natural state and understanding where you’re weak, that that’s where you really see success.

Nannette

And where you’re strong.

Al

So let’s back up. When I said when I first got out of school, I had the didactic all the book knowledge, but I’d never seen the real practice of it. So you just hit on that it’s the same process, you get the book knowledge. Now how do you go out and apply that because if you never apply it, then you shouldn’t have learned it in the first place.

John

We call that a call back. Dude, that was rock solid. I’m so proud of you right now.

Clint

Well, you know, to touch on touch on that point a little bit. You know, there’s a lot of people out there will tell you if you do these 10 things, if you know, the 10 steps to sales success are these. You say a lot, John, that’s a vacuum. That works in a vacuum in one situation. Yeah, if I did these 10 things correctly. Okay, maybe that will work.

Al

Let’s slow down guys, you teach in a vacuum?

John

No, of course.

Clint

To each situation, I’m not denying that.

Al

I’m in the field, and we’re running, or we’re doing a sales call, which I love to go on doing sales call calls, because now you get the feedback, right? Well, because the vacuum is the classroom, is the process, then when Nan and I go into a sales call together, we play off of each other. And then we debrief after the fact.

Clint

Well, what I was saying with that is that there’s no 10 things that you can do to every situation there. They all change, every situation is a little bit different. You have to adapt, you have to do some things, and you have to be personality wise, you have to be accepting to other personalities and do some things.

Al

In a certain sense. I almost disagree. I still think you do the 10 things. But you let the client determine when those 10 things occur, or whatever your sales process is, you know, they put you off, they can’t be with you today. Stay with the bonding and rapport. Maybe do a challenge like, Well, when I people tell me that, sometimes they really just don’t want to meet with me. John, is that the case we have here?

Nannette

And someday, we’re going to talk about a plan. But basically, I mean, truly, it’s so important to go with the flow, but have a plan.

Al

But guys, we’re going to foreshadow a lot of that as we get into the meat and potatoes. How we do this. We’re basically talking about who we are and fitting into this process. But eventually we will get to if you guys listen long enough, I hope to tell you everything I know. And if you communicate with us, and you get on some of our correspondence channels, let us know what you’re thinking. What are your challenges, because we all have them? Because that’s what’s made us kind of pull together, because we all approach them in a different way.

Clint

Yeah, well, you hit on it just a second ago when when me and you kind of disagreed a little bit. Right. So that’s that…

Al

I would never disagree with you.

Clint

You already did twice today.

Yeah. So that’s the dynamic of of this is that every day we’re dealing with challenges who are not always going to agree, we’re not going to all have the same idea about how to deal with this situation.

Al

Oh, and we’re gonna mess a lot of stuff up.

It’s not your success. Did you have to worry Oh, yeah. It’s like, was I failure? And how do I not do that?

Clint

How do you how do you learn from your failures? How do you move forward? I’m hoping that out of this, one of my failures can save somebody listening a ton of time and money and resources.

Al

Absolutely. Shorten the learning curve, because here’s the beauty of making mistakes. When I said if you hadn’t burnt your house down before, then you really haven’t challenged yourself, you hadn’t gone out and not everybody’s you know, some people are risk averse, I understand that. But if you’re, if you’re wanting to be successful in anything, you sort of got to extend yourself. But what you learn to do is recreate the success that much quicker. Because you you you’ve learned something, you don’t waste your time with some of that other stuff as you got to the top of the hill the first time. So when you roll down the hill, you don’t take the steep path, you know, you follow the goat trail up.

Clint

You take the switch backs.

Al

Exactly.

John

So we’re going to start wrapping up. Yeah, we’ve been here talking for a minute and obviously Al could talk all day.

Al

Oh no, really guys?

Clint

I got a couple questions for you guys.

John

For us or for Al?

Clint

To wind down here on I. So as a as a hard C, a high corner C naturally. John, how do you deal with when you sell to an I? How do you deal with that guy?

John

It’s, it’s my hardest one, honestly, because I want to focus on facts. Yeah. And I’m not really great at small talk. And I don’t really care about small talk with people that I don’t care about. So when I, when I’m dealing with an I and they went to tell me these stories, man, it just burns me out. Like, let’s get to the fucking point. Yeah, and let’s talk about if we’re gonna do business or not, because I’ve got other people to go talk to you. I have to balance that with letting them chat and let them kind of control the conversation and get into that. It’s not easy, but I know that it’s there. And I know that I have to do it.

Clint

So sort of put it in that crosshair access perspective, you and Doc are very opposite personalities, right? We struggled a little bit whenever we were together and it was mostly just because whenever we worked together, it was before we had done any of this work. I didn’t know I was a C, he didn’t know he was an I.

And we’d become friendly over the over the last couple years. So I’m not talking about you two directly, I’m talking about C’s and I’s.

John

You’re gonna struggle.

Al

Okay, but I hear me out on this though. I think C’s are great teachers, and I think I’s, personally, I like to learn something.

Clint

Well you got to get your information from somewhere.

Al

So a lot of times if somebody you know, got their facts and figures, that’s kind of sexy. I’m like, all right, tell me a little bit about that. And don’t get to disturbed if I run around and in, you know, ask a bunch of you know, you know, questions that may not be germane because I’m just trying to hone in. So a lot of the engagement that I have with I’s is I have a question and you have some facts. And then I’m going to make a funny and you got to put up with that.

John

You mean C’s?

Al

Yeah, I’m sorry, to C’s. And, and so a lot of the dynamic between us is, you’ve been an instructor to me, and in a certain sense, and I’m appreciative of it, all you have to do is buckle down and tolerate my nonsense as we get down the road. That’s true, because I’m going to follow your advice. I’m not doing my own books. I’m not fighting my own lawsuits. And I want some hard hitting pitbull guys like yourselves in there. And I want the kindness that Nan brings to the table. Yeah, you know, I want the whole village showing up for the for the event.

Clint

I think that’s a good point. I think on the spectrum that you guys, you gals and guys. As an I, you respect a lot of all the great traits because you’re a team player at the end of the day. So you like to you like you like to see all the traits come into play. Everybody has a role. John has a role. I have a role. I’m your pit bull. He’s your he’s your data guy. S is the one that kind of hones you in.

Al

Makes me feel good.

Clint

Makes you feel good, sure. So so not all personalities believe that. I think that the I’s and the S’s believe that a little bit more because your people driven.

Al

But that’s what I see. Everybody sees their own vision. That’s the reality. So when somebody says, Yeah, we see to it, you know, we roll upon an accident and somebody’s vomiting and the other person is going oh my god, that’s amazing, right? Or it’s just, it’s like living, life is like liver and onions. I personally love liver and onions. I love liver and onions. But to some people they’d want to vomit. That’s all this is, liver and onions.

Clint

So I love your answer about how you deal with I’s ,John, and Al out your feedback was great. Nan, jow do you deal, as an S, because to sell to an I from an S point of view, you guys are very people oriented. You guys like to talk about everything, what ifs, possibilities.

Nannette

So I believe what an I needs is for someone to listen to them. So I tried to listen, and not respond too quickly, and be cognitive of their feelings.

Clint

So that’s what me and John are missing in dealing with an I. But how do you get? How do you push? If you’re an S dealing with an I? How do you push the conversations forward in order to get task things done? Because to me, that would be the ultimate terrible situation in my head is if I was an S.

Nannette

So that’s why you have to listen, and hear what their need is, and then respond to it.

Al

I don’t have any needs.

Nannette

And they always have needs.

Clint

So so if I was an S out there listening to what you guys are talking about right now, how do…

Al

If you were an S?

You’re never gonna be an S.

Clint

If I was an S.

I get that. But if if I’m an out there if I’m out there and I’m an S trying to sell to an I, how do I how do I move the conversation forward?

Al

We take our shirts off.

Nannette

He’s by the way, Clint is married to the most beautiful S I’ve ever seen in my life.

Al

Clint does have a pretty wife.

John

Stay on task. So yeah, Nan, how do you how do you? How do you keep the conversation moving forward when you’re selling to an I?

Nannette

I already said that. I listen. And then I respond to what I hear the need is because they’re going to say a lot of things.

Clint

Love a lot of is a big words.

Nannette

Okay, so you have to find what they really need.

Al

So what Nan, because Nan and I work together, and so we come from our different personalities into the same equation a number of times.

Nan listens. That’s one of her strong traits.

But Nan has an honest voice that tells me things that I hear. Right. And I and God that sounds ambiguous.

Clint

Well does she hit you on more of like a spiritual level versus a factual level?

Al

Not spiritual, no, I’m not spiritual.

Clint

Okay, spiritual is not a great word. I’m struggling with the word to find, but a inner voice level?

Al

Her voice is one that I trust.

Clint

There you go.

Al

Okay, so so I guess maybe when you really hone it down, it’s like, I know, she’s not going to tell me something that’s a lie. She’s going to be kind about anything that she says to me. But she’s going to be able to point out, it’s genuine like, Hey, you weren’t very nice there or you could do this a different way. And it would be better.

Clint

That’s like your Garmin back inthe day, left turn.

Al

A little bit. Don’t put us in a car together, sometimes I can go awry.

John

Okay, so not to cut you off. We got to wrap this up. Paul’s giving us the look over there. So we didn’t do this. We didn’t do this yesterday, or on the last episode, because these are not going to take feedback very well anyway. But I’m curious, Al, for I’s in general, what’s one piece of advice that you would give them to be better, more proficient, more efficient?

Al

Get a process because you do get scattered, okay, learn from a system that you trust and that you want in your wheelhouse? And use it and force yourself to use it? If you do, you will see your performance increase.

Clint

Is that the motivation, the increase?

Al

When you win? Or you get a success? Absolutely. I mean, that’s probably everybody sitting down. Yeah, I think so if you’re, if you’re successful, it’s every salesperson. And if you see your bottom line, and you’re trying to run a business, and you got payroll, and there’s people that need to be paid, which is part of the role that I play, then yeah, that that’s good.

John

And then specifically, and then and then we’ll be done. I’m curious for people in the medical device industry, specifically, if you’re going to give them one piece of advice, and and not even speaking just as an I, but just in general, like what where do you see people messing up or that they can be better?

Al

You know, healthcare is a great industry, it’s anywhere between 28% and 34% of the GDP of any given volume, meaning a city, state, country. It’s a big industry. Tere’s a lot of sales opportunities out there. You deal with a tough clientele, you deal with a lot of smart, challenging people that are your competition. Most of the people were educated in this arena. And opinionated. You have to go in and you have to challenge yourself. You have to establish equal business stature. If you don’t own a medical degree, you’re dealing with somebody who thinks they have a leg up, but they really don’t. They’re still human beings just like you. Challenge yourself, know your system, know your product, and figure out what pain it solves for the industry.

John

Awesome. That’s great.

Clint

Can I hit on one thing? And like talk about…

John

Oh man, when did you become an I? Go ahead.

Clint

So I’d like to hit on the fact that if I were a D selling to an I, it doesn’t happen very often in my business. Yeah, that’s fair, what we do, we went down the spectrum a little bit. I think it’s an easy transition for a D to an I. I think you have to be you have to realize that, hey, we’re all here to have fun. And when you can, when you can talk about that fun side. You’re on the same side of the spectrum. Right? So as that cross hair, that vertical axis, horizontal axis, D’s and I’s are on the same side of the spectrum when it comes to certain traits.

John

Being gut driven.

Al

Outgoing.

Clint

Outgoing. We’re, you know, we talked about we talked about a long time ago, you know, dress and you said, yeah, we all think we’re dressed correctly. Me and you think we’re dressed more correctly than those two?

Al

Doesn’t matter, right.

Clint

But the point of it is, is that, the point of it is though, that D’s and I’s are on the same on the same side of the spectrum. So we can relate to some things, you have to find those commonalities to an I, from a D to an I, or from an I to D and S’s, and S’s and C’s can do that D’s and C’s can do that. But you have to find your commonalities and the personalities. And once you do do that, I think it’s easier for you to accept what you’re dealing with. And you slide that way just a touch.

Al

Well, and and to add to that, trust and respect. True. I mean, if you keep those two values in any of these arenas, and you and your, when you look across the table, they don’t have to be you. Cuz if that’s all you can communicate to you’re…

Clint

They’re never going to be you.

Al

Absolutely, but people get all tied up with, well I don’t like that person. So what? Go do your damn job?

Clint

Why would you want to deal with you? Because I wouldn’t want to deal with me?

Al

Oh, I know. I don’t.

Clint

I don’t think you want to deal with you.

Al

I’s drive me nuts. I think I’d rather talk to you and you and you, somebody that’s not me because then I’m like, Okay, let me, I get to shine a little bit more, be a little bit different.

Clint

So I think as we look around the personality spectrum, we have a lot of common words that will float throughout different personalities. D’s and I’s have some, C’s and D’s have some, I’s and S’s have some, S’s and C’s have some, we have those commonalities. And I want to take those buzzwords, and I want to say, you know, to our audience here that you will find… Look for those commonalities. Look for those buzzwords that you see in somebody else across the spectrum and run with that because that’s what’s going to get you together. That’s what’s going to make you be able to work together.

John

That’s awesome. Yeah. I think that’s like probably the best place to end it. So thanks everybody for tuning in. If you want to reach out or if you have questions, reach out to us. All the social media, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, it’s all at Sales Throwdown. And we will be back next week, go subscribe, follow us. Give your feedback. Go. Have a great week.

Clint

Have a snapchat channel but it’s not appropriate for sales.

Al

Alright guys, have a great week. Bye bye.